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Addiction

LSD Withdrawal Symptoms

LSD Withdrawal Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is an extremely powerful psychedelic drug synthesized from ergot, a fungus that commonly grows on rye and other grains. Its hallucinogenic properties are so powerful that people measure their dosage in micrograms. As little as 25ug to 75ug, which users describe as a “mild experience,” can cause visual hallucinations, while a 700-1000ug can induce a “full out-of-body-experience[1].” LSD, however, in some cases, has the potential to cause psychological issues – especially in people with psychosis, schizophrenia, or a family history of mental illness. LSD may actually exacerbate these conditions. The US DEA classifies LSD as an illegal Schedule 1 controlled substance, which is very likely to be abused and doesn’t have any documented use in medical treatments. LSD works by stimulating the serotonin (brain chemical) production in the cortex and deep structures of the brain, by activating serotonin receptors. These serotonin receptors help interpret and visualize the real world. The additional serotonin allows more stimuli to be processed than usual.The brain filters out irrelevant stimuli, but with LSD this is not the case [2]. This overstimulation causes changes in thought, perceptions, attention, and emotions. These alterations appear as hallucinations. Sensations seem real, but they are… 

Can You Take Xanax While Pregnant?

When Is Xanax Not Safe? Alprazolam, sold under the brand name Xanax, treats anxiety disorders and panic disorder (sudden attacks of extreme fear and worry about these attacks). Alprazolam is in a class of drugs named benzodiazepines. It is a prescription drug that is only recommended for use for up to six weeks because it is habit-forming. Taking Xanax can lead to physical dependence and addiction. Mental health disorders that warrant the need for a medication like Xanax occur in around 500,000 pregnant women every single year. Women are more likely to receive a prescription for a benzodiazepine than men. Sometimes women suffer from anxiety prior to getting pregnant, and other times, being an expectant mother can add a certain amount of stress that brings anxiety. Hormones also play a hefty role in the development of anxiety and panic. There is a 60 percent increased likelihood of suffering from anxiety disorders among females compared to men. This risk likely stems from women being prone to higher amounts of estrogen and progesterone — two sex hormones with proven ties to emotional and mental health, such as anxiety, depression, and trouble concentrating. But is it safe to use Xanax while pregnant? Probably not. Studies… 

Codeine Addiction Treatment

Codeine Info What is Codeine? Codeine is a member of the opioid family of drugs that are derived from the opium poppy and synthesized in a laboratory to create an analgesic drug that is commonly prescribed for the treatment of chronic pain, off-label use in cough, restless leg syndrome, and sometimes diarrhea [1]. Codeine is considered a narcotic, and it does carry a potential for causing addiction though it is not typically considered as dangerous as some other opiates such as Hydrocodone or Oxycodone. Mixing codeine with alcohol impairs the medication’s desired impact, which often leads people to drink or ingest more substances to achieve a similar high. This increase can lead to an opioid overdose, alcohol poisoning, or both. Codeine is also available in combination with acetaminophen (Capital and Codeine, Tylenol with Codeine), aspirin, carisoprodol, and promethazine and as an ingredient in many coughs and cold medications. Codeine (alone or in combination with other medications) comes as a tablet, a capsule, and a solution (liquid) to take by mouth. It is usually taken every 4 to 6 hours as needed [2]. The Drug Enforcement Administration classifies codeine as a Schedule II drug, meaning that it has a high potential for abuse and its use could cause psychological or physical… 

How Long Does Codeine Stay in Your System?

What Is Codeine? Codeine is a member of the opioid family of drugs that are derived from the opium poppy and synthesized in a laboratory to create an analgesic drug that is commonly prescribed for the treatment of chronic pain, off-label use in cough, restless leg syndrome, and sometimes diarrhea [1]. Codeine is considered a narcotic, and it does carry a potential for causing addiction though it is not typically considered as dangerous as some other opiates such as Hydrocodone or Oxycodone. Mixing codeine with alcohol impairs the medication’s desired impact, which often leads people to drink or ingest more substances to achieve a similar high. This increase can lead to an opioid overdose, alcohol poisoning, or both. Codeine is also available in combination with acetaminophen (Capital and Codeine, Tylenol with Codeine), aspirin, carisoprodol, and promethazine and as an ingredient in many coughs and cold medications. Codeine (alone or in combination with other medications) comes as a tablet, a capsule, and a solution (liquid) to take by mouth. It is usually taken every 4 to 6 hours as needed [2].  Codeine is the most commonly taken opioid medication. It is at the center of the opioid addiction crisis in the United States and thus is highly regulated.… 

Methadone and Libido

Methadone Sexual Dysfunction A variety of studies evidenced a relationship between drug use disorders and sexual dysfunction, such as meth and erectile dysfunction, Adderall erectile dysfunction, and cocaine and erectile dysfunction. This may have caused people to combine such drugs with Viagra ( Adderall and Viagra, Meth and Viagra, Cocaine and Viagra). In particular, heroin and opioid agonist medications to treat heroin dependence, such as Methadone and Suboxone, have been found to be associated with erectile dysfunction and reduced libido. Controversial findings may indicate the possibility of factors other than the pharmacological effects of opioid drugs concurring with sexual dysfunction [1]. These factors include the potentially related hormonal changes reflecting hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis function and prolactin (PRL) pituitary release, the role of adverse childhood experiences in the clinical history, and the concomitant symptoms of co-occurring mental health disorders in contributing to sexual problems. Although some drugs can initially increase sexual response, particularly in those with previous sexual problems, the chronic use of substances tends to deteriorate all stages of sexual function in both male and female drug users. In line with this evidence, a very high prevalence of sexual dysfunction was recently reported in association with substance use disorders with a… 

Does Meth Cause Erectile Dysfunction?

Short-Term Meth Sexual Effects on Men Methamphetamine is a dangerous drug when used recreationally and illegally. Specifically, homemade meth and crystal meth can be particularly hazardous. That being said, methamphetamine is known to have numerous adverse effects on your mental and physical health, like many other illicit drugs. However, one of the lesser talked-about side effects of meth use is the meth sexual effects, or how it impacts your sex habits and sexual behavior. One short-term meth sexual effects on men are boost in sexual pleasure. This can be attributed primarily to the fact that meth is a stimulant drug. As your body becomes more sensitive to stimulation and your brain receives a flood of neurotransmitters like dopamine, you may feel euphoric, which can carry into sex. As a result, most men report a more enjoyable sexual experience when they first use meth. Some meth users find that, at first, the drug enhances sex. But over time, meth’s sexual effects can be very damaging.+ The powerful effects of meth on sex may play a vital role in addiction. Meth users enjoy more pleasurable sex and orgasms, encouraging them to continue using the drug. But the meth’s pleasurable effects on sex… 

Is Codeine a Blood Thinner?

Can Codeine Cause Low Blood Pressure? Yes. Codeine can cause a sudden drop in your blood pressure. As a result, you may feel dizzy and/or lightheaded. Codeine is used to relieve mild to moderate pain. It is also used, usually in combination with other medications, to reduce coughing. Codeine can only help relieve symptoms but will not treat the cause of symptoms or speed recovery. Is codeine a blood thinner? No, on their own, opioids are not blood thinners.  This drug belongs to a class of medications called opiate (narcotic) analgesics and to a class of medications called antitussives. When codeine is used to treat pain, it works by changing the way the brain and nervous system respond to pain. When codeine is used to reduce coughing, it works by decreasing the activity in the part of the brain that causes coughing. Unfortunately, Codeine may be habit-forming or may cause substance abuse. You have to take codeine exactly as directed. Do not take more of it, take it more often, or take it in a different way than directed by your doctor. While taking codeine, you should discuss with your healthcare provider your pain treatment goals, length of treatment, and… 

Does Suboxone Raise Your Blood Pressure?

What Is Suboxone? Suboxone is the brand name for a prescription medication that is designed to treat opioid addiction. It’s typically used in the management of opioid abuse and withdrawal. Suboxone has two ingredients: the opioid Buprenorphine and the medication Naloxone. The combined effects of these two ingredients reduce cravings for addictive opioids such as Heroin, Codeine, Fentanyl, and Oxycodone. Suboxone, like any opiate, and many other medications, can be abused.  For instance, some individuals buy Suboxone on the street in order to prolong their heroin use. If you or a loved one is addicted to Suboxone, seeking professional inpatient drug rehab will be an important step towards recovery in the safest way possible. Suboxone is classified as a Schedule III controlled substance in the United States, meaning it’s a drug deemed to have a medical value yet also carries a moderate risk for addiction [1]. Therefore, only doctors who receive certifications from the Department of Health and Human Services may prescribe Suboxone. This medication is manufactured as dissolvable films and tablets. Suboxone and Methadone are both commonly used FDA-approved medications that are used to treat opioid addiction. Many people who take this medication are concerned with how long Suboxone will stay in their system. It takes your body almost two… 

Adderall Erectile Dysfunction

What is Adderall Erectile Dysfunction? Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common type of male sexual dysfunction. It is when a man has trouble getting or keeping an erection. ED becomes more common as you get older. But it’s not a natural part of aging. [1] Many medicines and recreational drugs can affect a man’s sexual arousal and sexual performance. What causes erection problems in one man may not affect another man. Adderall erectile dysfunction may occur likely in someone who misuses the drug. According to FDA, Adderall’s adverse effects include impotence and changes in libido. [2] Adderall is a brand name for the combination of dextroamphetamine and amphetamine.  It’s a prescription drug used principally for ADHD treatment or to treat narcolepsy (daytime sleepiness).  The medication adjusts certain naturally occurring chemicals in your brain by enhancing the effects of neurotransmitters such as dopamine and norepinephrine.  However, the combination of dextroamphetamine and amphetamine can be habit-forming and may cause Adderall addiction. If you or a loved one struggles with substance abuse with Adderall, call today to speak with one of We Level Up treatment specialists. We will help you explore treatment options.   Can Adderall Cause Erectile Dysfunction? Yes. Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a possible side effect for people taking…