Skip to content

aa 12 steps pdf

Al-Anon 12 Steps Worksheets PDF

Free Al-Anon 12 Steps Worksheets PDF Click the button below to view, print, or download the 12 step worksheets. It breaks down each step, why it’s important, and has questions to help guide you or a sponsee through the 12 steps (such as the 12 Principles of AA and the 12 steps of NA). Scroll down on this page for a preview of what is included in this worksheet A 12-step program may seem daunting to a newcomer. You might be curious about the practical implications of abstract ideas like making amends or believing in a higher power. Your sponsor should be your primary source for the detailed instructions for each step. Work the steps only with their input and perhaps the rest of your group. Your group’s publications are a great resource in this process as well. There’s a good reason the procedure is termed “working the steps.” Each stage necessitates meticulous mental work in addition to practical steps. The 12-steps are intended to assist us in better comprehending the causes of our addiction and what we can do to combat it. This demands a great deal of introspection and soul-searching. Because of this, focused questions are an essential component of the equation.… 

12 Principles of AA

A Short History of the 12 Principles of AA Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) was founded in 1935 by Bill Wilson and Robert Smith. Alcoholics Anonymous has grown to include worldwide chapters devoted to helping individuals end their alcohol dependence. Wilson, struggling with alcoholism, initially sought help from a Christian organization, The Oxford Group. The Oxford Group’s expansive focus was designed to help people overcome their problems by confronting their fear and selfishness. Ultimately, Wilson broke away from the group to develop an organization specifically formed to contend with alcoholism, a problem rampant during his era and one that continues to plague millions in the U.S. and abroad. Wilson met Akron surgeon Robert Smith at an Oxford Group meeting. Like Wilson, Smith also suffered from alcoholism. Both Wilson and Smith found that The Oxford Group’s treatment of sin as a “disease” resonated in discussions of their struggles with alcohol. The 12 Principles of AA drew heavily from these spiritual elements. Wilson was the first to kick his alcohol dependence. He attributed his success to working with other alcoholics. He founded his principles on that work and his meetings with Smith, whom he helped achieve sobriety. In many ways, Wilson was ahead of…