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Signs Of Self Destructive Behavior

How To Stop Self Destructive Behavior?

Understanding Self-Destructive Behavior  Self-destructive behaviors or dysregulated behaviors are those that are bound to harm you mentally or physically. It may be unintentional, or it may be that you know exactly what you’re doing, but the urge is too strong to control. Self-destructive behaviors provide relief or even pleasure in the short term but ultimately get in the way of living a satisfying and fulfilling life. These behaviors can include substance use disorder, compulsive computer gaming, smoking, binge eating, self-harm, chronic avoidance, or other behaviors that feel helpful in the moment but harmful over time. It can be related to a mental health condition, such as depression, borderline personality disorder, PTSD, or anxiety. It’s not uncommon for substance abuse and a psychological disorder to co-exist. In fact, at the root of any addiction is a psychological disorder. And for this reason, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) includes addiction as one of the many psychological disorders it lists. The DSM is a reference tool that therapists and psychologists use to facilitate arriving at a diagnosis in their patients. Addiction and self-destructive behavior might develop for one or two reasons, both of which are related to one another. Many of us are engaged in self-destructive… 

Addiction and Self Destructive Behavior

What Is Self-Destructive Behavior? Self-destructive behavior is the term used to describe harmful actions and thoughts a person directs towards themselves. Some people who show self-destructive behavior are aware of their actions and continue to do them out of habit or impulse. It may be due to earlier life experiences related to childhood trauma, neglect, and abuse. It can also be related to a mental health condition, such as depression, borderline personality disorder, PTSD, or anxiety. While some of the self-destructive behaviors may seem trivial or unimpactful to the person initially, these unhealthy actions often interfere with the person’s happiness and peace. When it comes to alcohol or drug addiction, there are a lot of additional factors involved that can affect the person on their path to sobriety. Sometimes, these additional factors are conditions that preceded or developed as a result of alcohol or drug addiction. One such condition is self-destructive behavior, and understanding what it is and how it can affect your sobriety can help you succeed in treatment. What are the common risk factors for self-destructive behavior? You might be more prone to behave in a self-destructive manner if you’ve experienced drug or alcohol use, childhood trauma, neglect,…