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High Functioning Meth Addict

High Functioning Meth Addict, Identifying Meth Addict Behavior & best Treatment Options

What Is A Functional Addict?

High functioning meth addicts keep their jobs and continue to take part in family and community activities. However, this doesn’t mean they don’t need help. It is only a matter of time. Many high functioning meth addicts will be able to work relatively well for a while, but the myth of functioning addiction lies in the fact that an addicted individual will not be able to maintain the facade indefinitely.

Denial is a major element of drug addiction. People who are unwilling to admit to the extent of their problem often convince themselves they have everything under control. In addition, the support of family and friends can play another role in helping the addicted person maintain their functioning status while using drugs. Being able to hold a steady job allows people as well to think they are not really addicted. Often, the high functioning meth addict finds value in regular employment because it provides them with the financial ability to support their drug or meth addiction.

What Is Meth?

Methamphetamine is a powerful and highly addictive stimulant that may affect your central nervous system. Although medications have proven effective in treating some substance use disorders, there are currently no medications that counteract the specific effects of methamphetamine. Also, there is no medication yet to prolong the abstinence from meth or to reduce the misuse of the drug. Evidently, the most effective meth addiction treatment at this point are behavioral therapies, such as cognitive-behavioral and contingency management interventions. [1]

High Functioning Meth Addict
Most high functioning meth addicts do everything possible to keep up appearances in spite of their addiction.

The methamphetamine drug is also known as meth, blue, ice, and crystal. It takes the form of a white, odorless, bitter-tasting crystalline powder that easily dissolves in water or alcohol. Meth can also be smoked, snorted, injected, or orally ingested.

Long-term methamphetamine abuse has many negative consequences, including addiction. Addiction is a chronic, relapsing disease, characterized by compulsive drug seeking and use and accompanied by functional and molecular changes in the brain.

As is the case with many drugs, tolerance to methamphetamine’s pleasurable effects develops when it is taken repeatedly. Abusers often need to take higher doses of the drug, take it more frequently, or change how they take it in an effort to get the desired effect. Chronic methamphetamine abusers may develop difficulty feeling any pleasure other than that provided by the drug, fueling further abuse. Withdrawal from methamphetamine occurs when a chronic abuser stops taking the drug; symptoms of withdrawal include depression, anxiety, fatigue, and an intense craving for the drug. [2]

Meth Addict Behaviour

Experts warn that many people with addictions continue to perform at work. So-called “high functioning meth addicts” exist across all sectors, and workplaces aren’t intervening early enough, which puts those who have addictions at a higher risk of physical and psychological harm, experts argue. [3]

In fact, methamphetamine is a drug that does not allow much room for casual use. Users quickly become addicts. The health of addicts quickly deteriorates, as does their ability to tend to basic personal hygiene. Meth is often referred to as the “dirty drug.” The physical signs of meth abuse that you may slowly notice with a high functioning meth addict include:

  • Eye Movement: Rapid eye movement and dilated pupils
  • Low Body Weight: Users lose weight rapidly and often appear sick
  • Dental Problems: Meth use causes serious tooth decay
  • Skin Sores: Users often pick at imaginary bugs under their skin (“meth bugs”), causing open sores, infections, and scarring of the skin
  • Body Odor: Chemicals are emitted from the skin of meth users, often producing strong and unpleasant odors
  • Facial Appearance: The faces of users often appear pale or splotchy and maybe sweaty as well

High functioning meth addicts in time will also be paranoid, jittery, and anxiety-ridden. They may communicate with senseless and irrational babble and their speech may be impaired. They are prone to moodiness and violent outbursts. [4]

High Functioning Meth Addict
High functioning meth addicts often wake up with headaches, lethargy, and nausea.

High Functioning Meth Addict

Do you know how meth use can affect job performance and cause you problems at work? Even if you or a loved one is a high functioning meth addict now, meth addiction can crash one life so fast that you will likely lose your job one day sooner. How can meth abuse affect your work:

  • Poor performance
  • Inconsistent work quality. Lack of concentration and focus. Decreased productivity or erratic work patterns
  • Increased absenteeism or when on the job or you’re not mentally there while at work.  Unexplained disappearances while at work
  • Poor judgment
  • No regard for your safety or the safety of others
  • Erratic behavior
  • Borrowing money
  • Customers and co-workers start complaining about you
  • Inappropriate personal appearance

All these factors suggest that there is something negative going on in your life. All are factors that can lead to being fired. [5] Don’t risk getting fired.   

Signs of Meth Addiction

Recognizing an addiction problem in someone you know can be harder than it seems. The American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) [6] defines addiction as a chronic disease that affects the brain’s reward, motivation, and memory functions. Someone with an addiction will crave a substance or other behavioral habits. They’ll often ignore other areas of life to fulfill or support their desires.

General signs of addiction are:

  • Lack of control, or inability to stay away from a substance or behavior
  • Decreased socialization, like abandoning commitments or ignoring relationships
  • Ignoring risk factors, like sharing needles despite potential consequences
  • Physical effects, like withdrawal symptoms or needing a higher dosage for effect

These signs are commonly linked. The degree of intensity for each sign may depend on how long the addiction has been going on. A healthy person can usually identify negative behavior and get rid of it. This is not the case with someone with an addiction. Rather than admit the problem exists, they’ll find ways to justify and continue the behavior.

The first step to getting help is being able to recognize the physical, mental, and emotional signs, like abrupt weight or personality changes in your friends or family members.

Meth Addiction Treatment Near Me

If you are addicted to meth or any other drugs, your first step in recovery should be medical detox in a safe and medically supervised setting. We Level Up detox & substance abuse treatment center medically assist clients in clearing their systems of addictive substances. In addition, a comprehensive team prescribing medications can alleviate your withdrawal pains while monitoring your health 24 hours. Thus, assuring both your safety and comfort.

Pseudoephedrine addiction
If you or someone you love is a high functioning meth addict, it’s only a matter of time before the worst things can happen, contact We Level Up addiction rehab center near you today!

High functioning meth addicts need lots of support during treatment programs and as a loved one, you should be prepared for almost any results. You will need to remain patient throughout the journey. Meth addicts experience a wide range of emotions including anger, fear, depression, and anxiety. Many relapses may happen after appearing to be doing well. This is all part of the sobriety process, as hard as it may be to accept.

How We Can Help? Searched for “Meth addiction treatment near me?” or are you seeking a national inpatient rehab destination?

We Level Up thorough approach to rehabilitation supports several levels of care to ensure the best possible outcome for every client who enters our doors. From an intensive and more supportive atmosphere for those in the early days of recovery to a comfortable residential-style living dynamic upon completion of detox, we are here to help guide you down the safe and results-based path to your sobriety. Once detox is complete, a new doorway in treatment opens up, referred to as a residential level of care to help the clients uncover the cause of drug abuse and receive therapies.

We Level Up residential care program slowly and effectively introduces the individual into an atmosphere of therapeutic growth, marked by Master’s level therapists, clinicians, group counselors, psychiatrists, and a community of like-minded individuals with the same aim: to attain sobriety and live a great life.

Clients in residential therapy programs will live comfortably within the facility during this crucial and fragile time. This supportive environment is designed to give clients 24-hour care for sobriety, removing temptations for relapse and applying an air of recovery into every component of the treatment timeline.

We Level Up finds that when clients are living in a supportive community, especially during their early recovery process, they can truly focus on what matters most: their recovery. Make this your opportunity to reclaim your life with a safe drug addiction treatment.

Call today to speak with one of our treatment specialists to see the options.

Addiction eventually takes a physical and mental toll. As time passes, you will become less able to keep up the façade. If you want to help a loved one or yourself recover from drug addiction before it’s too late, you need to know the signs of a high functioning meth addict.

Sources:

[1] Methamphetamine – National Institute on Drug Abuse
[2] What are the long-term effects of methamphetamine misuse? – National Institute on Drug Abuse
[3] “High-functioning addicts”: intervening before trouble hits – National Center for Biotechnology Information
[4] Recognizing a Meth Addict – https://ag.nv.gov/Hot_Topics/Issue/Meth_Addict/
[5] You Lose Your Job Because of Drugs – https://www.justthinktwice.gov/you-lose-your-job-because-drugs
[6] https://www.asam.org/quality-practice/definition-of-addiction