Suboxone Detox, Withdrawal Symptoms, Timeline & Treatment

Inpatient treatment is the best option for those undergoing a Suboxone detox treatment and subsequent therapies to end their addiction. At We Level Up, we can offer access to a supportive environment and medical assistance as you detox. Continue to read more about Suboxone withdrawal symptoms, causes of addiction, and treatment.

By We Level Up | Editor Yamilla Francese | Clinically Reviewed By Lauren Barry, LMFT, MCAP, QS, Director of Quality Assurance | Editorial Policy | Research Policy | Last Updated: May 6, 2023

Suboxone Detox Overview

Suboxone is a medication that is generally used to treat opioid use disorder. It has buprenorphine, a partial opioid agonist that can help reduce withdrawal symptoms and cravings. Naloxone is added to Suboxone to discourage medication misuse. However, like all medications, Suboxone can also cause withdrawal symptoms when stopped abruptly or tapered too quickly.

Suboxone detox may feel more complex than other detox regimens because it requires getting off a drug that was supposed to end other substance abuse. During Suboxone detox, you will probably deal with severe original symptoms such as anxiety, insomnia, and panic. This is why taking Suboxone detox in an addiction treatment facility with professionals nearby to help is vital.

In this article, we will tackle the cause, symptoms, and the best treatment options for the side effects of suboxone withdrawal. At We Level Up treatment center, we understand how frightening the idea of going through a withdrawal can be. Withdrawal symptoms can be uncomfortable, and you may not know how to deal with them.

Suboxone Detox Timeline

How long does it take to detox off Suboxone? Several factors, including the duration and severity of the addiction, the dosage and length of Suboxone use, and individual differences in metabolism, determine the timeline for Suboxone detox. Generally, the following is a rough timeline of what to expect during Suboxone detox:

Days 1-3.The first few days of Suboxone detox are typically the most difficult, with symptoms of withdrawal peaking around 72 hours after the last dose. Common symptoms may include anxiety, insomnia, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal cramps, muscle aches, and sweating.
Days 4-7.Withdrawal symptoms may improve during the second half of the first week of Suboxone detox, although some signs and symptoms, such as anxiety and insomnia, may persist. Individuals may also experience symptoms such as depression, fatigue, and loss of appetite.
Week 2.Withdrawal symptoms may continue to improve during the second week of Suboxone detox, although some symptoms, such as fatigue and depression, may persist. Individuals may also experience cravings for opioids or Suboxone during this time.
Weeks 3-4.By the third and fourth weeks of Suboxone detox, most physical symptoms of withdrawal should have resolved. However, some individuals may continue to experience psychological symptoms such as depression, anxiety, and cravings.
It’s critical to seek medical help when stopping Suboxone, especially if you are experiencing severe withdrawal symptoms. Your healthcare provider can help you safely taper off the medication and provide medications or other treatments to help manage withdrawal symptoms.

Suboxone Withdrawal Symptoms

How long does Suboxone withdrawals last? And the symptoms of Suboxone withdrawal can vary from person to person based on several factors, such as the individual’s dosage, duration of use, and overall health. Common Suboxone withdrawal symptoms include the following:

  • Nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.
  • Muscle aches and pains.
  • Anxiety and restlessness.
  • Insomnia and difficulty sleeping.
  • Sweating and chills.
  • Runny nose and watery eyes.
  • Irritability and mood swings.
  • Depression and difficulty concentrating.

The acute phase of Suboxone withdrawal, which includes the most intense physical symptoms, typically lasts for around two weeks. However, some people may experience withdrawal symptoms for a more extended period, up to several weeks or even months. This is known as (PAWS) post-acute withdrawal syndrome, which can include symptoms such as anxiety, depression, and insomnia.

Suboxone Precipitated Withdrawal

Suboxone precipitated withdrawal is a rapid and intense onset of withdrawal symptoms that can occur when a person physically dependent on opioids takes Suboxone too soon after their last use of opioids. This can happen if Suboxone is brought before the opioids have entirely cleared from the body or if the person is not in a state of withdrawal when they take Suboxone.

When Suboxone is taken, it attaches to the same brain receptors that opioids do, but it does not produce the same euphoria or sedation. Instead, it helps to manage withdrawal symptoms and reduce cravings for opioids. However, suppose Suboxone is taken too soon after the last use of opioids. In that case, it can cause the remaining opioids in the body to be displaced from the receptors and rapidly precipitate withdrawal symptoms.

Precipitated withdrawal and Suboxone can be more severe and intense than regular withdrawal, and it can happen very quickly within minutes of taking Suboxone. Symptoms can include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle aches and pains, anxiety, restlessness, insomnia, sweating, and chills.

It’s critical to wait until a person is in a state of withdrawal before starting treatment with Suboxone. Healthcare providers will assess and screen for recent opioid use before prescribing Suboxone. Furthermore, healthcare providers can monitor the individual’s symptoms and adjust the dose of Suboxone as needed to minimize the risk of precipitated withdrawal.

How To Stop Suboxone Withdrawals?

Stopping Suboxone use abruptly or without proper medical supervision can result in withdrawal symptoms. If you are experiencing Suboxone withdrawal symptoms, seeking medical help is critical. By seeking medical help when stopping Suboxone, individuals can receive support and guidance from healthcare providers experienced in treating opioid addiction. Medically-assisted Suboxone detox can help minimize the following risks:

  • The severity of withdrawal symptoms.
  • Reduces the risk of relapse.
  • Ensuring a safe and successful recovery.
Abruptly stopping Suboxone use or reducing the dosage too quickly can result in severe withdrawal symptoms. Detoxing off Suboxone requires support from Suboxone detox healthcare professionals trained and experienced in treating opioid dependence.
Abruptly stopping Suboxone use or reducing the dosage too quickly can result in severe withdrawal symptoms. Detoxing off Suboxone requires support from Suboxone detox healthcare professionals trained and experienced in treating opioid dependence.

Learn More:

Suboxone Drug Facts

Generic Name: Buprenorphine and Naloxone (oral/sublingual) [ BUE-pre-NOR-feen-and-nal-OX-one ]
Drug Class: Narcotic analgesic combinations.
Dosage Form: Buccal film, Sublingual film, Sublingual tablet.

What is Suboxone?

According to the NIDA(National Institute on Drug Abuse), more than 90,000 people die yearly from drug addiction. Of those people, 75% have an opioid use disorder. To treat opioid addiction, one of the medications that treatment centers rely on is Suboxone.

Suboxone contains two main ingredients. These are buprenorphine and naloxone. Buprenorphine, a partial opioid agonist, acts in your body as a mild opioid substitute. It binds to opioid receptors without creating an intense high, making it possible for someone with an addiction to opioids to avoid severe withdrawal symptoms. Naloxone is an opioid antagonist that hinders the effects of potent opioids, making relapse less likely to occur in patients who take Suboxone.

Suboxone is a film or strip tablet that dissolves under the tongue. Patients should never inject or crush Suboxone and mix it into liquid. The correct way of using Suboxone to help treat addiction is to place it under the tongue and allow it to dissolve there. This allows the ingredients to function as intended. If you inject or snort the drug, however, it is feasible to get addicted to its immediate effects.

Using Suboxone to Detox

How does Suboxone help with withdrawals? Suboxone for withdrawal can be an effective medication for detoxification from opioids. Suboxone contains buprenorphine and naloxone, which work together to reduce withdrawal symptoms and cravings for opioids. Buprenorphine is a partial opioid/opiate agonist, which means it acts by activating the same brain receptors as opioids but creates a milder effect. This helps to diminish withdrawal symptoms and cravings without having the intense euphoria or sedation associated with opioids. Naloxone is an opioid antagonist which hinders the effects of opioids and helps prevent medication misuse.

When used as part of a medically-assisted opioid use disorder treatment plan, Suboxone can be effective in managing withdrawal symptoms and helping individuals transition to a drug-free life. However, it’s crucial to use Suboxone under the supervision of a healthcare provider and in combination with counseling and behavioral therapies.

What is Oxycodone withdrawal treatment? Withdrawal from Oxycodone is generally not life-threatening but can be uncomfortable and may require medical attention to manage symptoms and prevent complications. An opioid detox is essential during this critical phase of early recovery.
Suboxone detox is essential during the critical phase of early recovery. Working with a healthcare provider to develop an individualized tapering plan is the safest and most effective way to discontinue Suboxone use.

Does Suboxone Help With Opiate Withdrawal?

Does Suboxone help with withdrawal pain? Yes. Suboxone (a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone) can help manage opiate withdrawal symptoms. Buprenorphine, a partial opioid agonist, can bind to the same brain receptors as opiates but produces a milder effect. This supports lessening withdrawal symptoms and cravings without having the intense euphoria or sedation associated with opiates. Naloxone is an opioid antagonist that hinders the influences of opiates and helps prevent medication misuse.

Suboxone can be part of a comprehensive treatment plan for opiate addiction, including medication-assisted treatment (MAT), counseling, and behavioral therapies. It is necessary to use Suboxone under the supervision of a healthcare provider, who can prescribe and monitor the dosage and duration of treatment.

Suboxone for Alcohol Withdrawal

Does Suboxone help with alcohol withdrawals? Suboxone is not typically used to treat alcohol withdrawal. It is specifically indicated for the treatment of opioid dependence and is not effective in treating alcohol withdrawal symptoms.

Alcohol withdrawal is a potentially life-threatening health problem that can cause seizures, hallucinations, and delirium tremens (DTs). Treatment for alcohol withdrawal typically involves benzodiazepines, which are used to manage symptoms such as anxiety and seizures.

Suboxone for Kratom Withdrawal

Suboxone is sometimes used to treat Kratom withdrawal, which can occur when someone stops using Kratom after a period of regular use. Kratom is a substance that can produce opioid-like effects, and withdrawal symptoms can be similar to those of opioid withdrawal. However, Suboxone should not be used as a first-line treatment for Kratom withdrawal; the same goes for using Kratom for Suboxone withdrawal. Other non-opioid medications and behavioral therapies may effectively manage withdrawal symptoms and promote long-term recovery.

Withdrawing from Suboxone

Can you withdraw from Suboxone? Unfortunately, yes. But a gradual tapering process under medical supervision can help reduce the risk of Suboxone withdrawal symptoms, severity, and duration. This involves gradually decreasing the dosage of Suboxone over several weeks or months. The healthcare provider may also prescribe medications to manage specific symptoms, such as anti-nausea medication, muscle relaxants, or sleep aids.

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Suboxone Statistics

The below statistics suggest that Suboxone is increasingly being used as a treatment option for opioid addiction in the United States. However, there are also issues about the potential for medication misuse and diversion.


1.2 Million

The number of individuals who received medication-assisted treatment (MAT) for opioid addiction (including Suboxone) increased from 361,000 in 2011 to 1.2 million in 2018.

Source: SAMHSA

1.6 Million

In 2019, 1.6 million people in the United States aged 12 or older had used Suboxone for non-medical purposes at least once in their lifetime.

Source: NSDUH

70%

Suboxone was the most commonly prescribed medication for opioid addiction in 2019, with 70% of providers reporting that they prescribed it.

Source: ASAM


Top 10 How To Deal With Suboxone Withdrawal? FAQs

  1. What helps Suboxone withdrawal?

    Everyone’s experience with Suboxone withdrawal is different, and what works for someone may not work for another. Working with a healthcare provider to create an individualized treatment plan that addresses the individual’s specific needs and circumstances is best.

  2. Can Suboxone withdrawal kill you?

    Suboxone withdrawal is not considered life-threatening. However, some risks are associated with Suboxone withdrawal, particularly if the individual has a history of severe opioid addiction or co-occurring medical or psychiatric conditions. Another risk is relapse. If the individual experiences severe withdrawal symptoms or cannot manage cravings and triggers, they may be at risk of relapse to opioid use, which can be life-threatening in some cases.

  3. Can you get off Suboxone without withdrawals?

    Do you withdrawal from Suboxone? It is difficult to avoid all withdrawal symptoms when coming off Suboxone, as it is a powerful opioid medication that alters brain chemistry and can lead to physical dependence. However, a gradual and supervised tapering process can help reduce withdrawal symptoms’ severity and duration.

  4. How long does it take to feel withdrawal from Suboxone?

    The length and severity of Suboxone withdrawal can vary based on the individual’s dosage, length of use, and other factors. However, a slow tapering process under medical supervision can help to minimize withdrawal symptoms and allow the individual to safely and comfortably discontinue the medication.

  5. Do babies withdrawal from Suboxone?

    Infants born to mothers who’ve been using Suboxone or other opioids during pregnancy may experience a condition called neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). NAS is a collection of symptoms that occur in newborns who were exposed to opioids in utero and are experiencing withdrawal after birth. Treatment for NAS typically involves monitoring the baby’s signs and providing supportive care, such as swaddling, frequent feedings, and medication to manage specific symptoms, if necessary. In some cases, babies with severe NAS may need to be hospitalized for treatment.

  6. How long until Suboxone withdrawal starts?

    Generally, withdrawal symptoms can start anywhere from a few hours to a few days after the last dose of Suboxone. Because Suboxone has a long half-life, meaning it stays in the body system for an extended period, withdrawal symptoms may not begin as quickly as they would with other opioids. However, once withdrawal symptoms start, they can be severe and may last several days to several weeks.

  7. How long do Suboxone withdrawals last?

    How long are Suboxone withdrawals? The duration of Suboxone withdrawal symptoms is determined by several factors, including the individual’s dosage, length of use, and other factors. Generally, withdrawal symptoms can last anywhere from several days to several weeks, although some individuals may experience symptoms that persist for several months.

  8. How long do withdrawal symptoms last from Suboxone?

    The timeline for Suboxone withdrawal can vary widely based on the individual, and some individuals may experience more or less severe symptoms at different points in the detox process.

  9. How long to detox from Suboxone?

    The onset of withdrawal symptoms typically begins within the first 12-24 hours after the last dose of Suboxone. During the first few days, symptoms may include muscle aches, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal cramping, sweating, chills, and insomnia. While most acute withdrawal symptoms will have resolved by now, some individuals may experience more persistent symptoms such as anxiety, depression, and Suboxone withdrawal insomnia. These symptoms may last for several weeks to several months.

  10. Can you die from Suboxone withdrawal?

    While withdrawal from Suboxone can be uncomfortable and even painful, it is typically not life-threatening. However, in some cases, withdrawal from Suboxone can lead to complications that may require medical attention. These complications may include dehydration, electrolyte imbalances, or other medical conditions that can arise due to the withdrawal process.

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What Does Suboxone Withdrawal Feel Like?

Can you withdrawal from Suboxone? Unfortunately, yes. It is hard to avoid withdrawal symptoms from Suboxone. Withdrawal from Suboxone looks a bit different from most withdrawal processes. Many addicts mistake initial endorphin drops for withdrawal. However, withdrawal does not begin until addicts start tapering off dosages. How long are withdrawals from Suboxone? Withdrawal can take as long as 72 hours, and the whole process can last up to a month.

Many Suboxone withdrawal symptoms mimic those of other drugs, especially opioids. How long do Suboxone withdrawal symptoms last? You will experience the worst physical and psychological symptoms within 72 hours after withdrawal. Psychologically, you may experience resurgent symptoms such as anxiety, agitation, and insomnia. These can continue for days or even weeks after beginning the detox process.

What are withdrawal symptoms of Suboxone? Other symptoms of Suboxone withdrawal include the following:

  • Muscle aches.
  • Trembling.
  • Watery eyes.
  • Diarrhea.
  • Feeling very cold or very hot.
  • Intense cravings.
  • Vomiting.
  • Intense sweating.
  • High blood pressure.
  • Fatigue.
  • Loss of appetite.

During the first week of withdrawal, your physical symptoms will decrease, but you may still experience anxiety and mood swings. Within two weeks, the worst physical and psychological symptoms will reduce dramatically.

What helps with withdrawal from Suboxone? Turning to medical professionals for help during detox is essential to ensure you are comfortable and not relapse.

At We Level Up Suboxone withdrawal help, we perform a complete intake assessment of your physical and mental health. This allows us to understand your addiction and any co-occurring mental health disorders you may struggle with. Using this information, we can put together a personalized treatment plan that can help you with the worst of the Suboxone withdrawal symptoms and allow you to begin your path toward healing.

Many professionals believe it is best to wait to administer Suboxone until someone with an opioid addiction has begun showing signs of withdrawal. Still, some doctors offer micro-dosing options early in recovery. Suboxone has a low to moderate risk of altering your brain chemistry and function, but this risk increases when you use it for extended lengths of time than prescribed or inject or snort it.

Some of the signs of a Suboxone addiction include the following:

  • Impaired coordination.
  • Itching.
  • Slurred speech.
  • Doctor shopping.
  • Inability to think clearly.
  • Nausea.
  • Vomiting.
  • Slowed breathing.
  • Constipation.
  • Loss of inhibition.

There can also be side effects of long-term use of Suboxone. These are:

  • Cardiovascular system damage.
  • Sleeping problems.
  • Dental issues.
  • Excessive weight loss.
  • Chronic constipation.
  • Stomach bleeding.

Suboxone has a ceiling, which means that increasing the dose past a certain level no longer increases its effects. Therefore, it is not common for people to overdose on Suboxone. Still, there are instances when this may be a concern. Suboxone overdose includes the following signs and symptoms:

  • Low blood pressure.
  • Respiratory distress.
  • Pinpoint pupils.
  • Loss of consciousness.
  • Coma.

How long does it take to withdrawal from Suboxone? Several factors and individual requirements determine the timeline. If you have an addiction to Suboxone, the best thing you can do is to seek professional help. At We Level Up, we offer treatment for Suboxone misuse, beginning with the Suboxone detox process we offer at our state-of-the-art facilities.

Home Remedies for Suboxone Withdrawal

How long does withdrawal last from Suboxone? It depends on several factors and the health status of the patient. Before doing any home treatment, it is best to consult your doctor to avoid complications. While there is no substitute for medical treatment for Suboxone withdrawal, some home remedies may help alleviate symptoms and provide some relief during the withdrawal process. Here are a few examples:

  • Hydration: It is crucial to stay hydrated during Suboxone withdrawal, as symptoms such as vomiting and diarrhea can cause dehydration. Drinking plenty of water, electrolyte-rich sports drinks, or coconut water can help to replenish electrolytes and fluids.
  • Hot Baths or Showers: Hot baths can help soothe muscle aches and relieve symptoms such as chills and sweats.
  • Exercise: Engaging in light activities such as walking, yoga, or stretching can help to boost mood, alleviate anxiety, and reduce muscle aches.
  • Balanced Diet: A healthy and balanced diet rich in nutrients can help support the body’s recovery process during withdrawal. Fruits, lean protein, vegetables, and whole grains can give the body the necessary healing nutrients.
  • Herbal Remedies: Some herbal remedies, such as chamomile tea, lavender oil, and valerian root, may help to promote relaxation, improve sleep, and reduce anxiety.

How to detox from Suboxone at home? While these home remedies may help to alleviate symptoms during Suboxone withdrawal, they should not be used as a substitute for medical treatment. Working with a healthcare provider to create an individualized tapering plan is the safest and most effective way to discontinue Suboxone use.

Suboxone is a prescription drug that helps treat opioid addiction. If you do not take Suboxone as prescribed, however, you can become addicted to it. Detoxing is the first step in getting sober for those struggling with an addiction to this medication. At We Level Up, we can offer inpatient treatment and support for patients seeking Suboxone detox treatment.

What is codeine addiction treatment? It is essential to seek professional help when trying to quit codeine addiction, as medical supervision can help manage the withdrawal symptoms of codeine and reduce the risk of relapse.
What helps with Suboxone withdrawals? Suboxone detox at home can be dangerous. It is essential to seek professional help when trying to quit Suboxone, as medical supervision can help manage the withdrawal symptoms and reduce the risk of relapse.

Rapid Suboxone Detox

The rapid detox Suboxone treatment process uses Vivitrol therapy. Vivitrol is a brand name for naltrexone, a fast-acting medicine for people detoxifying from opioid or alcohol dependency. It acts by blocking the influence of opioids, decreasing cravings, and reducing a person’s need for the drugs. Naltrexone is also much less addictive than Suboxone, which makes it an excellent alternative treatment option.

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How long does it take to detox off of Suboxone? Suboxone detox typically lasts about one to two weeks, with the most intense symptoms occurring within the first few days. However, some individuals may experience prolonged withdrawal symptoms lasting several weeks or even months.

Your personally-tailored care and treatment can include the controlled administration of Vivitrol, and it also provides sedation. You will still experience the side effects of Suboxone withdrawal, but as you are sedated and under expert medical care, you will find them much easier to deal with, and of course, you will have people close to you to help you every step of the way.

Can you die from withdrawal from Suboxone? While rare, it is still possible when further complications from the withdrawal symptoms arise. For most individuals in recovery, the use of Suboxone is temporary. Drug use will eventually be tapered to make way for total sobriety. Suboxone rapid detox process should be done slowly and accurately, allowing plateaus to accommodate the individual’s experience and stability.

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Suboxone Withdrawal Treatment

How long for Suboxone withdrawal to subside? The severity and timeline of Suboxone withdrawal symptoms can be impacted by various factors, including the individual’s physical and mental health, age, and whether they have any underlying medical or psychiatric conditions.

How to ease withdrawal symptoms from Suboxone? Suboxone withdrawal treatment typically involves a combination of medication and supportive care to help manage withdrawal symptoms and promote recovery. Here are some common approaches to Suboxone withdrawal treatment:

  • Medication-Assisted Treatment: Medications such as Clonidine for Suboxone withdrawal, benzodiazepines, and non-opioid pain relievers may be prescribed to help manage the physical symptoms of Suboxone withdrawal. Moreover, medications such as buprenorphine or methadone may be part of a medication-assisted treatment program to help ease withdrawal symptoms and reduce the risk of relapse.
  • Behavioral Therapy: Behavioral therapy, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) or contingency management, can help individuals develop coping strategies to manage triggers and cravings and learn new ways to manage stress and other emotional issues that may contribute to drug use.
  • Supportive Care: Supportive care, such as nutritional support, hydration, and sleep management, can help individuals manage the physical symptoms of withdrawal and promote overall health and well-being during the detoxification process.
  • Residential or Inpatient Treatment: Depending on the severity of the addiction and the individual’s needs, residential or inpatient treatment programs may be recommended to provide comprehensive care and support for addiction recovery.

Suboxone withdrawal can be a challenging process, and it’s essential to seek the guidance and support of a healthcare professional to ensure safe and successful detoxification.

Inpatient Suboxone Detox Treatment

Inpatient treatment is the best option for those detoxing from Suboxone and subsequent therapies to end their addiction. At We Level Up, we can offer access to a supportive environment and medical assistance as you detox. Our inpatient program allows you to remove yourself from your regular environment, which may not be conducive to healing. You will be able to have medical detox as well as medication-assisted treatment. These options can help you avoid intense cravings that can cause you to relapse.

After you have gone through Suboxone detox, you can begin your therapies. We offer some of the leading options for addiction treatment, including behavioral therapies like cognitive-behavioral therapy, motivational interviewing, dialectical behavior therapy, and more.

We also offer evidence-based therapies to help you re-learn how to live your life and gain self-confidence. These therapies include art therapy, music therapy, yoga, and much more. To help you feel less alone with your addiction, you will also have access to family therapy sessions, group therapy, and support groups.

Once you complete our inpatient treatment, you can participate in our alumni programs. These are lifelong, free programs that can assist you in maintaining long-term sobriety. You can return to your life knowing you have help if you need it. Our alumni programs help you build a support team you can rely on and give you access to medical professionals, therapists, and more.

How to detox off Suboxone? The Suboxone detox protocol involves a medically supervised detoxification process to manage the withdrawal symptoms associated with Suboxone discontinuation. Even low-dose Suboxone withdrawal should not be taken lightly to avoid further complications. The following are the steps on how do you detox off of Suboxone:

When dealing with the risks of heroin and addiction problems, the care and supervision of a medical professional accredited for heroin detox and treatment are necessary.
How to help Suboxone withdrawal? When dealing with the risks of Suboxone and addiction problems, the care and supervision of a medical professional accredited for Suboxone detox and treatment are necessary.
  • Medical Assessment: The first step in treating Suboxone withdrawal is a comprehensive medical assessment that evaluates the patient’s health status, substance use history, and any co-occurring mental or physical health conditions. This information helps the healthcare team develop an individualized treatment plan.
  • Medication-Assisted Treatment: Medications such as Clonidine and Gabapentin for Suboxone withdrawal when the risks of seizure arise. Benzodiazepines and non-opioid pain relievers may be prescribed to help manage the physical symptoms of Suboxone withdrawal. Additionally, medications such as buprenorphine or methadone may be part of a medication-assisted treatment program to help ease withdrawal symptoms and reduce the risk of relapse.
  • Supportive Care: Supportive care, such as nutritional support, hydration, and sleep management, can help individuals manage the physical symptoms of withdrawal and promote overall health and well-being during the detoxification process.
  • Behavioral Therapy: Behavioral therapy, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) or contingency management, can help individuals develop coping strategies to manage triggers and cravings and learn new ways to manage stress and other emotional issues that may contribute to drug use.
  • Follow-Up Care: After completing the Suboxone detox protocol, individuals should receive ongoing care and support to help maintain their recovery. This may include continuing medication-assisted treatment, engaging in individual or group therapy, and attending support groups such as 12-step programs.

Suboxone Detox Centers Near Me

To find a “Suboxone detox near me,” you can follow these steps:

  • Check with Your Insurance Provider: Contact your insurance provider to find out if they cover Suboxone detox treatment and if there are any facilities in your area that they work with. If your insurance plan covers the cost of treatment, it can be a helpful way to narrow down your options and find a facility that is covered by your plan.
  • Use Online Directories: Online directories of addiction treatment centers, such as SAMHSA’s Behavioral Health Treatment Services Locator, can help you find Suboxone detox centers near you. These directories provide detailed information about the facilities, such as their location, contact information, and the types of treatment they offer.
  • Ask for Referrals: Contact your primary care physician, mental health provider, or other healthcare professionals to ask for recommendations for Suboxone detox centers in your area. You can also ask friends, family members, or support group members with addiction treatment experience for referrals. Many Suboxone withdrawal stories are successful when assisted medically.
  • Research the Facilities: Once you have a list of potential Suboxone detox centers, research each facility to learn more about their approach to treatment, their qualifications and experience, and their success rates. You can also read rehab reviews from other clients, patients, or families who have received treatment.
  • Contact the Facilities: Contact the Suboxone detox centers you are interested in to learn more about their treatment programs, insurance coverage, and availability. Ask questions about their approach to treatment, the qualifications of their staff, and the types of therapy and support they offer.

Start Suboxone Detox

If you have an addiction to Suboxone and want to get help, choosing a facility that offers a Suboxone detox program is essential. At We Level Up, we can provide a safe and supportive environment where you can undergo treatment.

We will work with you to create a personalized treatment plan that can treat the addiction and any co-occurring mental health disorder you have.

There is no reason to struggle through addiction on your own. By turning to experts at We Level Up, you can get the help you need. Contact We Level Up today to learn more about the treatment we can offer.

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Top 10 Suboxone Withdrawal Duration FAQs

  1. When does Suboxone withdrawal start?

    The timing of how long does it take for Suboxone withdrawal to start can vary based on a few factors, such as the individual’s usage history, dosage, and overall physical health. The onset of Suboxone withdrawal symptoms usually begins within 24-48 hours after the last dose.

  2. How long does Suboxone withdrawal take to kick in?

    The withdrawal symptoms may start with mild symptoms such as anxiety, restlessness, and insomnia and then progress to more severe symptoms such as muscle aches, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and sweating. The intensity of when do Suboxone withdrawals start and the duration of the precipitated withdrawal Suboxone can cause vary from person to person.

  3. What happens when you withdraw from Suboxone?

    Suboxone is a prescription drug used to help people overcome opioid addiction. However, when a person stops taking Suboxone after prolonged use, they may experience withdrawal symptoms. The severity and how long Suboxone withdrawal last for these symptoms are determined by the individual’s dosage and length of use.

  4. How long does it take to detox from Suboxone?

    How long does it take to withdraw from Suboxone? The duration of Suboxone withdrawal symptoms can also depend on how the medication is tapered off. Under medical supervision, slow and gradual tapering can reduce withdrawal symptoms’ severity and duration.

  5. How long is Suboxone withdrawal?

    How long do withdrawals from Suboxone last? Some people may experience withdrawal symptoms for extended periods, up to several weeks or months. This is known as (PAWS) post-acute withdrawal syndrome, which can include symptoms such as anxiety, depression, and insomnia.

  6. How long does Suboxone withdrawal last?

    How long does withdrawal from Suboxone last? Gradual tapering of Suboxone under medical supervision is generally recommended to minimize the severity and duration of withdrawal symptoms. A healthcare provider can work with the individual to create a tapering schedule tailored to their specific needs and circumstances.

  7. How to get through Suboxone withdrawal?

    When Suboxone is tapered off gradually, the body has time to adjust to the decreasing levels of the medication, which can help to minimize the intensity and duration of withdrawal symptoms. This can make the withdrawal process more manageable and increase the likelihood of long-term success in recovery from opioid addiction.

  8. What are the withdrawal symptoms of Suboxone?

    Common withdrawal symptoms of Suboxone include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle aches and pains, anxiety, restlessness, insomnia and difficulty sleeping, sweating and chills, runny nose and watery eyes, irritability and mood swings, depression, and difficulty concentrating.

  9. How long does precipitated withdrawal last from Suboxone?

    How long does it take to get over Suboxone withdrawal? The time it takes to get over Suboxone withdrawal can vary from person to person and depends on several factors, such as the individual’s dosage, duration of use, and overall health. Generally, the acute phase of Suboxone withdrawal, which includes the most intense physical symptoms, lasts for around two weeks.

  10. How bad is Suboxone withdrawal?

    Suboxone withdrawal can be uncomfortable and challenging, but it is generally considered less severe than withdrawal from other opioids such as heroin or oxycodone. However, the severity of Suboxone withdrawal can still vary for everyone and depends on several factors, such as the individual’s dosage, duration of use, and overall health.

How Long Do Opiates Stay in Your System? How Long Do Opiates Stay in Urine, Blood, & Body?

Suboxone withdrawal how long? And how do opioids stay in your system? Watch the below video to understand the effects of drug dependency, the general timeline, and how to get help. Get FREE addiction treatment insurance check – https://welevelup.com/rehab-insurance/ If you or a loved one is struggling with opiates addiction or other substance use disorder(s), call for a FREE consultation 24/7 at (561) 678-0917

How Long Do Opiates Stay in Your System? Brief Video Transcript.

Drugs in the opioid class are used to treat pain. Natural opioids, semi-synthetic opioids generated from natural opioids, and synthetic opioids produced in a lab are all referred to as opioids under the general term. A class of medications known as opioids contain opiates, which are organic byproducts of the poppy plant. The main difference is that “opiate” refers to the substances derived from the opium (poppy) plant. At the same time, “opioids” are all substances that interact with opioid receptors, including those created in the lab.

The length of time that opiates remain in your system varies depending on the type of opiate, the dosage, and the frequency of use. Generally, opiates can stay in your system for two to four days. However, heavier and chronic users may have residues in their system for up to seven days.

Opiates can be detected in the blood test for up to 24 hours and in the urine test for up to three days. Opiates can be detected in the hair follicles for up to 90 days. In chronic users, opiates can stay in the body for up to 30 days.

Opiates often have short half-lives, meaning their effects can linger for several hours even though they swiftly leave the body. However, Opioids can linger in a person’s bloodstream for several hours or days after the symptoms subside, depending on the substance used. Urine tests, one of the more common types of drug testing, can identify opioid usage for longer periods of time, often up to three to four days, and some tests can identify opioid use for up to three months.

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[6] What is Buprenorphine? – Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)

[7] SUBOXONE (buprenorphine and naloxone) sublingual tablets – Food & Drug Administration (FDA)

[8] Medications for Opioid Use Disorder Study (MOUD Study) – Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC)

[9] The Facts about Buprenorphine – Veterans Affairs Available from: https://www.mentalhealth.va.gov/providers/sud/docs/english_buprenorphine_facts.pdf

[10] Buprenorphine Sublingual and Buccal (opioid dependence) – MedlinePlus – U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health