Skip to content

Mental Health

How To Stop Self Destructive Behavior?

Understanding Self-Destructive Behavior  Self-destructive behaviors or dysregulated behaviors are those that are bound to harm you mentally or physically. It may be unintentional, or it may be that you know exactly what you’re doing, but the urge is too strong to control. Self-destructive behaviors provide relief or even pleasure in the short term but ultimately get in the way of living a satisfying and fulfilling life. These behaviors can include substance use disorder, compulsive computer gaming, smoking, binge eating, self-harm, chronic avoidance, or other behaviors that feel helpful in the moment but harmful over time. It can be related to a mental health condition, such as depression, borderline personality disorder, PTSD, or anxiety. It’s not uncommon for substance abuse and a psychological disorder to co-exist. In fact, at the root of any addiction is a psychological disorder. And for this reason, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) includes addiction as one of the many psychological disorders it lists. The DSM is a reference tool that therapists and psychologists use to facilitate arriving at a diagnosis in their patients. Addiction and self-destructive behavior might develop for one or two reasons, both of which are related to one another. Many of us are engaged in self-destructive… 

Mental Health and Mass Shootings

Mental Health and Mass Shootings Issues In the U.S., popular and political discourse frequently focuses on the causal impact of mental illness in the aftermath of mass shootings. Evidence strongly suggests that mass shooters are often mentally ill and socially marginalized. Enhanced psychiatric attention may well prevent particular crimes. Mass shootings often shed light on the need for more investment in mental health support networks or improved state laws and procedures regarding gun access. [1] The death toll of mass shootings has risen sharply, particularly in the last decade. In the 1970s, mass shootings claimed eight lives per year. From 2010 to 2019, the average was 51 deaths per year. Mass shootings are often blamed on mental health issues in public discourse. But the research shows the role of mental illness in mass shootings is complicated, not clear-cut. Mental health issues were common among those who engaged in mass shootings, with psychosis playing a minor role in nearly one-third of the cases but a primary part 10% of the time. [2] Suicidality was found to be a strong predictor of the perpetration of mass shootings. Get Your Life Back Find Hope & Recovery. Get Safe Comfortable Detox, Addiction Rehab &… 

Dialectical Behavior Therapy vs Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

What is Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT)?  Dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT) is an acceptance-based counseling approach used to treat various substance use and mental health issues. DBT is a type of therapy that was developed by Dr. Marsha Linehan in the 1980s. It was originally developed for borderline personality disorder (BPD) treatment. It takes inspiration from CBT, or cognitive behavioral therapy, which is also used to treat drug and alcohol addiction, with the added focus on teaching acceptance skills. Now, individual and group treatments commonly employ dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT) for conditions such as depression, anxiety disorders, and substance use disorders (SUD), a medical condition defined by the uncontrollable use of substances despite the negative consequences. Multiple studies show that this updated approach, called DBT-SUD, can reduce drug use in people with borderline personality disorder, a mental disorder characterized by unstable relationships, distorted self-image, and impulsiveness. The term “dialectical” means the interaction of conflicting ideas. Within DBT, “dialectical” refers to the integration of both acceptance and change as necessities for improvement. Dialectical behavior therapy aims to address the symptoms of the disorder by replacing maladaptive behaviors with healthier coping skills, such as mindfulness, interpersonal effectiveness, emotion regulation, and distress tolerance. Get Your Life Back Find Hope &… 

Dialectical Behavior Therapy Benefits

What is Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT)? Dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT) is an acceptance-based counseling approach used to treat various substance use and mental health issues. DBT is a type of therapy that was developed by Dr. Marsha Linehan in the 1980s. It was originally developed for borderline personality disorder (BPD) treatment. It takes inspiration from CBT, or cognitive behavioral therapy, which is also used to treat drug and alcohol addiction, with the added focus on teaching acceptance skills. Now, individual and group treatments commonly employ dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT) for conditions such as depression, anxiety disorders, and substance use disorders (SUD), a medical condition defined by the uncontrollable use of substances despite the negative consequences. Multiple studies show that this updated approach, called DBT-SUD, can reduce drug use in people with borderline personality disorder, a mental disorder characterized by unstable relationships, distorted self-image, and impulsiveness. The term “dialectical” means the interaction of conflicting ideas. Within DBT, “dialectical” refers to the integration of both acceptance and change as necessities for improvement. Dialectical behavior therapy aims to address the symptoms of the disorder by replacing maladaptive behaviors with healthier coping skills, such as mindfulness, interpersonal effectiveness, emotion regulation, and distress tolerance. Get… 

June is Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Awareness Month

What is Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Month? Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Month occurs each June. It is a time for mental health specialists and the general public to come together to support those suffering from trauma. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder is a condition that many people struggle with. The symptoms change and evolve over time, but it’s important to get help as soon as possible because the sooner you receive treatment for your mental health disorder – especially one like PTSD where there are so few definitive treatments being offered -the better chance we’ll all have at living happy healthy productive lives while managing our own personal wellness journey together! Join The We Level Up network in bringing awareness to Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder In observation of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Awareness Month, the We level Up treatment center network wants to remind the general public that trauma can significantly impact adults, first responders, and veterans. In many cases, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder leads to chronic stress or anxiety which may result in developmental delays for kids and mental illnesses such as severe depression if not appropriately treated with complex PTSD therapy. Substance abuse could also occur due to this constant exposure over time. Post-Traumatic Stress… 

Ketamine for Anxiety

What Is Ketamine? Ketamine For Anxiety Ketamine is a dissociative anesthetic agent used in medical procedures as well as for the treatment of severe acute and chronic pain. Ketamine was first synthesized in the 1960s and began being used in medical settings as a dissociative anesthetic agent shortly thereafter. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved it in 1970. It continues to be used as an anesthetic induction agent and procedural sedative for children and adults and, even more commonly, in veterinary medicine. Ketamine’s utility, however, has expanded beyond its FDA-approved use as an anesthetic. It is sometimes prescribed for moderate to severe acute and chronic pain, and it is increasingly used as an antidepressant in patients who have not responded to other forms of treatment. While pharmaceutical ketamine is administered as an injectable solution, illicitly produced ketamine is often encountered as a powder or a liquid. In recreational use, the powder is cut into lines and snorted or smoked—either alone or in combination with marijuana or tobacco. Liquid ketamine may be injected or mixed into drinks. Ketamine purchased illegally is often cut with other drugs, including methamphetamine, amphetamine, Ecstasy (MDMA), and cocaine. Depending on the specific route of ingestion, the effects of the drug… 

May is Borderline Personality Disorder Awareness Month

What is Borderline Personality Month? Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is a mental illness that is characterized by difficulties in regulating emotions, impulsive and risky behavior, and distorted views of self and others. Despite its high prevalence, BPD is often misunderstood and stigmatized. In May 2007, the National Education Alliance for Borderline Personality Disorder (NEABPD) organized hearings before congress to educate legislators about the realities of BPD and began to formulate what is now Borderline Personality Month. A year later, in April 2008, the U.S. House of Representatives declared May as Borderline Personality Disorder Awareness Month. This designation helps to raise awareness of the disorder and reduce stigma. However, much work still needs to be done to fully support those who suffer from BPD. May is Borderline Personality Disorder Month In many ways, we have all been impacted by BPD. Many people, in times of great distress, can feel hopeless and even alone. That’s why we encourage others to help connect the millions of people out there that deserve our community’s hope and support. Join the We Level Up treatment center by educating others and bringing awareness to Borderline Personality Month. Support BPD Awareness Month  Destigmatize BPD Awareness Month  Borderline Personality… 

PTSI VS PTSD

Define PTSD Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorders (SUDs) are prevalent and frequently co-occur. [1] Comorbid PTSD/SUD is associated with a more complex and costly clinical course when compared with either disorder alone, including: Increased chronic physical health problems Poorer social functioning Higher rates of suicide attempts More legal problems Increased risk of violence Worse treatment adherence Less improvement during treatment In response, psychosocial treatment options and dual diagnosis treatment have increased substantially over the past decade and integrated approaches – treatments that address symptoms of both PTSD and SUD concurrently –are fast becoming the preferred model for treatment. PSTD vs PTSI Symptoms Re-experiencing is the most typical symptom of PTSD and PTSI. This is when a person involuntarily and vividly relives the traumatic event in the form of: Flashbacks Nightmares Repetitive and distressing images or sensations Physical sensations, such as pain, sweating, feeling sick or trembling Some people have constant negative thoughts about their experience, repeatedly asking themselves questions that prevent them from coming to terms with the event. For example, they may wonder why the event happened to them and if they could have done anything to stop it, which can lead to feelings of guilt or shame. What Is… 

Stress Awareness Month

April Stress Awareness Month Stress Awareness Month is an annual campaign that began in 1992 and has taken place every April since. Sponsored by The Health Resource Network (HRN), a non-profit health education organization, Stress Awareness Month is a national, cooperative effort to inform people about the dangers of stress, successful coping strategies, and harmful misconceptions about stress that are prevalent in our society. Stress has long been known to increase vulnerability to substance use disorders. Many clinicians and addiction medicine specialists suggest that stress is the number one cause of relapse to drug abuse, including smoking.  Long-term stress can prove to be more than just a mental issue. From headaches to stomach disorders to depression – even very serious issues like stroke and heart disease can come as a result of stress. Stress can change our behaviors and influence our interactions with others. And sometimes people get so used to dealing with it that it’s hard to recognize it in ourselves. Know the Signs of Stress: Physical – Headaches, sickness, indigestion Mental – Irritable, inflexible, short-tempered Emotional – Anxious, fearful, angry, frustrated, sad Behavioral – Sleep problems, substance abuse (food, alcohol, drugs) “Even though we’ve learned a lot about stress… 

Self Harm Awareness Day

Self Harm Awareness Day is a global event held annually on March 1. Its purpose is to remove the stigma attached to self-injury and to encourage parents, family members, educators, and healthcare professionals to recognize and respond to the signs of self-harm. What Is Self-Harm Awareness Month? March is recognized as the National Self Harm Awareness Month, a month dedicated to bringing awareness to something that happens across all genders, races, beliefs, and ages. One in five individuals will engage in self-injury in their lifetime, with the vast majority beginning during adolescence. [1] Self-harm, also known as self-mutilation, is an act of someone hurting themselves intentionally. If you are feeling intense emotional pain, have experienced trauma, or suffer from a mental health condition, you are more likely to self-harm. And for some, it is a shout for help. Self-mutilating behavior is often mistakenly diagnosed as attempts of suicide, but most people who self-harm are not attempting suicide. However, self-harm can cause more damage to someone’s health and safety, even causing accidental suicide. What Causes Self-Harm? There are different reasons why people harm themselves. Often, they have trouble coping and dealing with their feelings. [2] They harm themselves to try to: Make…