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How to Relieve Stress Without Alcohol?

Alcohol for Stress If you’re asking now, “how to relieve stress without alcohol?” This article is for you. Depression, stress, and anxiety often go hand in hand with heavy drinking. Studies show that people who are alcohol dependent are two to three times as likely to suffer from major depression or anxiety over their lifetime. When addressing drinking problems with alcohol treatment, it’s important to also seek therapies for any accompanying medical and mental health issues. Alcohol for stress will only exacerbate your symptoms. According to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 9.5 million U.S. adults experienced both mental illness and a substance use disorder in 2019. [1] The best alcohol treatment with dual diagnosis is integrated intervention, this is when you receive care for both your diagnosed mental illness and substance use disorder, such as alcohol. Drinking Alcohol to Relieve Stress Exposure to varying forms of stress is an integral life experience that can provoke a variety of reactions. In research on alcohol, drug, and psychiatric disorders, the term “stress” often is understood to indicate any experience denoting adversity. [2] Stress exposures consist of external stimuli that are: Threatening or harmful Elicit fear Anxiety Anger Excitement Sadness Mild… 

Overcoming Your Alcohol or Drug Problem

5 Steps to Overcoming Your Alcohol or Drug Problem Overcoming substance abuse requires a comprehensive system of support. There are several aspects of addiction you must focus on. Once you are ready to make that change, the next step on your path is getting the help you need. Here are the 5 steps to overcoming your alcohol or drug problem, and the reasons why the best time to seek help is NOW. How to Overcome Substance Abuse 1. Make a Decision to Change If you or a loved one is struggling with drug or alcohol abuse, the best time to seek help is now. Make a decision to seek and receive treatment because if you are facing drug addiction, your body can no longer simply stop using the drug. The body requires it. At this stage, the addiction is a disease requiring comprehensive support. Addiction treatment needs to address every component of this demand – the physical demand, the mental demand, and the emotional component. Get Your Life Back Find Hope & Recovery. Get Safe Comfortable Detox, Addiction Rehab & Dual Diagnosis High-Quality Care. 2. Commit to Your Decision Addiction is a disease. It is life-altering for those struggling with it… 

Rehab Motivation

How to motivate a loved one to go to rehab? Does rehab treatment work? According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, about one-third of people who are treated for alcohol problems have no further symptoms 1 year later. Many others substantially reduce their drinking and report fewer alcohol-related problems. [1] While according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, drug addiction treatment dropout is one of the major problems encountered by treatment programs; therefore, motivational techniques that can keep patients engaged will also improve outcomes. By viewing addiction as a chronic disease and offering continuing care and monitoring, programs can succeed. But this will often require multiple episodes of treatment and readily readmitting patients that have relapsed. [2] Addiction is a complex but treatable disease that affects brain function and behavior.  Drugs of abuse alter the brain’s structure and function, resulting in changes that persist long after drug use has ceased. This may explain why drug abusers are at risk for relapse even after long periods of abstinence and despite the potentially devastating consequences. Get Your Life Back Find Hope & Recovery. Get Safe Comfortable Detox, Addiction Rehab & Dual Diagnosis High-Quality Care. How do you convince… 

Substance Use and Mental Health Awareness Events Calendar

Everyone can participate in raising awareness about mental health and alcohol or drug addiction whether they have been diagnosed with the disorders or not. Talking about them not only creates awareness which could potentially help people with undiagnosed cases recognize their own symptoms, but it also reduces the stigma and allows those individuals to feel comfortable going to seek treatment for their mental illnesses. January February Get Your Life Back Find Hope & Recovery. Get Safe Comfortable Detox, Addiction Rehab & Dual Diagnosis High-Quality Care. March March is recognized as Self Harm Awareness Month, a month dedicated to bringing awareness to something that happens across all genders, races, beliefs, and ages. One in five individuals will engage in self-injury in their lifetime, with the vast majority beginning during adolescence. [3] Individuals who physically self-harm and abuse drugs or alcohol may be given a dual mental health diagnosis. If this is you, our team at We Level Up can help. Our dual diagnosis program is designed to assist those who struggle with a substance use disorder along with other mental health issues. We Level Up providers can work with you to address underlying struggles and set you on track for a… 

Men’s Mental Health Stigma

Why do many men have a harder time seeking treatment for mental illness? Even with the various mental health treatment modalities available, there is a disproportionate difference between the number of males experiencing mental health disorders and those seeking treatment. Mental health, particularly among men, has gained momentum in becoming the “other” silent killer. [1] Why is this? Men are thought to be deterred from engaging in mental health services due to socialization into traditional masculine gender roles. Traits associated with traditional masculinity include stereotypes of stoicism, invulnerability, and self-reliance, which are frequently discussed as they do not fit comfortably with psychological help-seeking. For instance, negative emotions are perceived as a sign of weakness, discouraging men from reaching out to friends. Causing men’s mental health stigma. This negatively impacts men’s overall help-seeking behaviors and their choice of treatment type. Failure to adhere to these masculine stereotypes can result in the internalization of discriminative views held by the wider public. These self-stigmatizing beliefs further discourage men from seeking help. Another explanation of men’s mental health stigma is that men often cope with mental health difficulties differently compared to women, demonstrating an increased tendency to self-medicate with alcohol and drugs to alleviate… 

60 Days Sober Brain

The Brain in Early Sobriety Difficulty walking, blurred vision, slurred speech, slowed reaction times, impaired memory: Clearly, alcohol affects the brain. Some of these impairments are detectable after only one or two drinks and quickly resolve when drinking stops. [1] On the other hand, a person who drinks heavily over a long period may have brain deficiencies that persist well after they achieve sobriety. Exactly how alcohol affects the brain, and the probability of reversing the consequence of heavy drinking on the brain remain hot topics in alcoholism treatment research today. What are the benefits of having 60 days of a sober brain?  Effects of Being Sober Risk factors for alcoholism overlap with the risk for alcoholic brain damage. But, alcoholics are not all alike. They encounter different degrees of impairment, and the illness has different origins for other people. Hence, researchers have not found definitive evidence that any one variable is solely responsible for the brain deficits discovered in alcoholics. The good news is that most alcoholics with cognitive impairment show at least some improvement in the brain structure and functioning after having 60 days sober brain, within a year of abstinence, though some people take much longer. Clinicians must consider… 

How to Intervention Drug Addiction

What is an Intervention? An intervention for addiction is an organized confrontation with a loved one about their drug or alcohol abuse. It can involve anyone (family, friends, coworkers) who has a relationship with the person struggling. They then use the opportunity to express how the person’s addiction has affected them. An intervention is not a form of addiction treatment but often a means of persuading a drug or alcohol addict to seek treatment from a rehab facility.  These are emotionally charged affairs that can be difficult for the addicted person and those who staged the intervention for addiction. Interventions are typically reserved as a last-ditch effort to motivate someone to seek treatment. They are not restricted to drug and alcohol addicts, and intentions can be used to confront a person about any debilitating behavior. A substance use disorder is a medical illness characterized by clinically significant impairments in health, social function, and voluntary control over substance use. “The good news is that a spectrum of effective strategies and services are available to identify, treat, and manage substance use problems and substance use disorders.” Research shows that the most effective way to help someone with a substance use problem who may be… 

Addiction Cycle

The Stages of Addiction As a country, we have a serious addiction cycle problem — the use of alcohol, illegal drugs, and/or prescribed medications in ways that produce harm to ourselves and those around us. These harms are significant financially with total costs of more than $420 billion annually and more than $120 billion in healthcare. But these problems are not simply financial burdens — they deteriorate the quality of our health, educational, and social systems, and they are debilitating and killing us — particularly our young through alcohol-related car crashes, drug-related violence, and drug overdoses. [1] What is substance use disorder? SUD happens when a person’s use of alcohol or another substance (drug) leads to health issues or problems at work, school, or home. This disorder is also called substance abuse. The exact cause of substance use disorder is not known. Is addiction hereditary? A person’s genes, the action of the drug, peer pressure, emotional distress, anxiety, depression, and environmental stress can all be factors. Many people who develop a drug or alcohol abuse have depression, attention deficit disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, or other mental problems. A stressful or chaotic lifestyle and low self-esteem are also common. Individuals who grow up seeing their parents using drugs… 

Ambien Abuse Side Effects

What is Ambien? Zolpidem, sold under the brand name Ambien, among others, is a medication primarily used for the short-term treatment of sleeping problems. Ambien is used to treat insomnia (difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep). Ambien belongs to a class of medications called sedative-hypnotics. It works by slowing activity in the brain to allow sleep. [1] Ambien Abuse Potential Ambien should normally be taken for short periods of time. If you take Ambien for 2 weeks or longer, Ambien may not help you sleep as well as it did when you first began to take the medication. Unfortunately, this drug may be habit-forming or may cause sedatives addiction. Ambien, a nonbenzodiazepine hypnotic, binds to the benzodiazepine binding site on the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA-A) receptors. Many studies have reported the efficacy and safety of zolpidem in the treatment of insomnia, low abuse, and dependence capability. However, many cases of zolpidem abuse and dependence were reported around the world. [2] Ambien Abuse Signs The signs related to Ambien dependence include: Tolerance Signs of withdrawal Use of the drug out of its therapeutic field (high doses, daytime consumption), with a goal other than treatment of insomnia, and they are unable to… 

Is Drug Addiction Genetic?

Does Addiction Run in Your Genes? Is drug addiction genetic? Why do some people become addicted while others don’t? Family studies that include identical twins, fraternal twins, adoptees, and siblings suggest that as much as half of a person’s risk of becoming addicted to nicotine, alcohol, or other drugs depends on his or her genetic makeup or inherited traits. Finding the biological basis for this risk is an important avenue of research for scientists trying to solve the problem of drug addiction. The risk of developing drug and alcohol problems is higher in children whose parents abuse alcohol or drugs—but it is NOT a guarantee. Research shows that children with parents who abuse alcohol or drugs are more likely to try alcohol or drugs and develop alcoholism or drug addiction. Why? Children whose parents abuse alcohol and drugs are more likely to have behavioral problems, which increases the risk of trying alcohol or drugs. They are also exposed to more opportunities to try these substances. Plus, children of parents who abuse drugs may inherit a genetic predisposition (or greater likelihood) for addiction—having an “addictive personality,” so to speak. Is drug addiction genetic? Most children of parents who abuse alcohol or drugs do not develop alcoholism or…