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Addiction

Xanax and Opiate Withdrawal

What is Xanax? Xanax is a powerful sedative. It depresses the Central Nervous System (CNS) and slows down the brain, creating a calming effect in the person taking it. It is a brand name for alprazolam[1]. It is a prescription drug used for anxiety treatment. Xanax is also sometimes prescribed for panic attack treatment. Xanax use can lead to physical dependence and addiction, which is why it is only recommended for use for up to six weeks. Withdrawal is one of the most common Xanax side effects. It is commonly experienced when someone reduces or stops using this prescription drug, which can lead to complications such as panic attacks, insomnia, and seizures. Withdrawing from Xanax under an inpatient drug rehab specializing in Xanax detox and Xanax addiction treatment reduces the risk of complications and helps the individual experience a safer, more comfortable recovery. Some individuals who are dependent on this prescription drug never abused drugs before. They were suffering from anxiety and looking to the medical field for support and relief. They began using Xanax and felt a vast improvement in anxiety symptoms. Some then assumed more of the drug would produce an even greater effect, so they misused Xanax in larger doses. Others just use Xanax for too long, and often… 

Opiate Withdrawal Restlessness

Acute Opiate Withdrawal Opiates contain opium, which is naturally derived from poppies. They fall under the category of opioids, a class of narcotic analgesics (highly potent and habit-forming painkillers). Opioids include illegal narcotics and pharmaceutical medications used to treat severe and chronic pain. Many use the terms synonymously, as both opiates and opioids are extremely addictive, dangerous, and potentially lethal. Opiates refer to natural opioids such as heroin, morphine, and codeine. Opiates are chemical compounds that are refined or extracted from natural plant matter (poppy sap and fibers). Despite all of the associated negative aspects (overdose, addiction, crime, etc.), prescription opiates still have a positive intent. They are commonly prescribed for the treatment of moderate to severe pain. These drugs, along with heroin, attach to specific proteins called opioid receptors, which are located on nerve cells in the brain, spinal cord, GI tract, and other organs. Acute opiate withdrawal symptoms are potentially life-threatening and manifest as a result of opiate dependence. Acute opiate withdrawal occurs when a person who is dependent on opiates suddenly reduces or stops taking the drugs. Trying to quit opiate “cold turkey” is difficult and dangerous to do on your own. For safety, it is best to seek… 

Depression and Substance Abuse Comorbidity

Understanding Comorbidity Comorbidity or the co-occurrence of mental disorders and substance use disorders is common. The prevalence of comorbidity in the community and the complex interactions between the two sets of disorders should raise doubts about how we continue to deal with each entity separately. Other names for comorbid conditions include co-occurring conditions, coexisting conditions, and less commonly, multiple chronic conditions or multimorbidity. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) [1], nearly 9.2 million adults in the United States have a comorbidity that includes a mental illness and substance abuse, or two types of mental illness, such as anxiety and depression. A substance use disorder can involve drug or alcohol addiction (or both). Comorbid mental illness and substance use disorder is also called a dual diagnosis and is less frequently referred to as MICD (mental illness/chemical dependency). The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) reports that nearly half of those with one condition—either mental illness or substance abuse—also have the other. People with a substance use disorder (SUD) are more likely to have a mental illness, and people with a mental illness are more likely to have a substance use disorder. One primary reason for this… 

Emotional Effects of Alcohol

Emotional Drinking Alcohol abuse can cause mental, physical, and emotional problems for alcohol abusers, and those who love them. The emotional effects of alcohol can be so severe that they lead to broken homes, lost jobs, and the inability to function. Sadly, far too many individuals know the pain of dealing with alcohol addiction. Too many people have been overcome by an alcohol problem. And too many families have been impacted by a loved one’s bondage to alcohol addiction. Let’s take a look at some of the most common emotional effects of alcohol abuse, and the impact they can have on abusers and their families. The emotional effects of alcohol can be powerful among those who have an existing physical or mental health condition. Over the long term, however, alcohol can make these conditions even worse. Alcohol affects the brain’s cerebral cortex, which is where consciousness and thought processing take place. Drinking alcohol, especially in large quantities, interferes with rational thought. Alcohol consumption also depresses the behavioral inhibitory centers, causing a person to display poorer judgment and have less inhibition. This lack of inhibition usually leads people to drink more than they otherwise would. While you may feel good for… 

How to Help an Addict Who Doesn’t Want Help?

How to Help an Addict Who Doesn’t Want Help? In an ideal world, every person struggling with drug addiction who arrives in drug rehab would be aware of their disease and determined to get well. But when dealing with drug addiction, ideal situations are rare. There’s a strong link between addiction and self-destructive behavior. Substance abuse and addiction are self-destructive behaviors, and a return to drug or alcohol abuse may be a coping mechanism or a perpetuation of self-destruction. Learning how to help an addict who doesn’t want help on how to stop their self-destructive behavior and the nature of their addiction will be a crucial step in understanding their situation. There is an ongoing debate about whether a person struggling with addiction who doesn’t want help can be helped. Many believe that only the addict can help themselves. They have to want to quit. But in the midst of active addiction, few addicts want to quit. In fact, most addicts are, by their very nature, unwilling patients. Changes in the brain, which drugs have hijacked, leave the addict powerless to truly see themselves and make rational decisions. Because they have come to depend on drugs to function, they will… 

Detoxing From Drugs While Pregnant

Understanding The Detox Process Detoxing from drugs or alcohol during pregnancy can be dangerous for the expectant mother and unborn baby at all stages of development. However, it can be done safely, under proper supervision and monitoring. Medical detox is a supervised process in which healthcare providers monitor clients and offer medications and supplements to ease withdrawal symptoms and detox as safely as possible — medical drug detox while pregnant should also include a practitioner familiar with OB/GYN practices to ensure that any prescribed medications do not result in complications to the pregnancy. How does drug and alcohol detoxification work? Drug and alcohol detoxification programs, also known as detox, can help people with substance use disorders begin this journey by providing them with the clinical support they need. Drug and alcohol detoxification is a process that is necessary for anyone who has become physically dependent on a substance. This can develop through chronic or heavy substance use. If you seek out a medical detox program, this process will begin with a clinical assessment, during which time you may be asked questions about your drug use history and health. Important Disclaimer We Level Up is a primary medical detox & inpatient… 

Side Effects of Inhalant Abuse

Inhalant Abuse Inhalant abuse – also known as volatile substance abuse, solvent abuse, sniffing, huffing and bagging – is the deliberate inhalation of a volatile substance to achieve an altered mental state. Inhalants are chemicals in the workplace and household products that produce chemical vapors. These vapors can be inhaled to induce mind-altering effects. Inhaled chemicals are rapidly absorbed into the brain to produce a quick high. Chronic abuse of inhalants can result in irreversible side effects, such as coma and even death. Abusers may inhale vapors directly from a container, from a bag into which a substance has been placed, or from a rag soaked with a substance and then placed over the mouth or nose. Intoxication occurs rapidly and is short-lived, although some abusers repeatedly or continuously self-administer inhalants to maintain a preferred level of intoxication. Inhalant abuse is more common in males than females. Higher rates of inhalant abuse have been reported in those with a history of physical or sexual abuse, delinquency, criminal behavior, depression, suicidal behavior, antisocial attitudes, family conflict, violence, and/or drug abuse. Rates are also higher in people of lower income, the mentally ill, those living in rural communities and those in communities… 

Is Heroin a Stimulant?

What is Heroin Made of? Heroin is an opioid drug produced from the substance morphine, which naturally occurs in the seed pods of different types of opium plants. This plant is the starting point for the creation of multiple narcotic substances: morphine, opium, codeine, and heroin. There are two major types of heroin currently sold on the streets today: white powder heroin and black tar heroin. The effects of heroin are very similar for both. Powder heroin is off-white in color and is the purer of the two types of heroin. Making powdered heroin involves refining heroin that has been processed to remove impurities. Black tar heroin is cheaper than other types of heroin because of its crude manufacturing process and its level of purity — most black tar heroin is estimated to only be 30-40% pure. Substances Used In Heroin It is extremely rare to find 100% pure heroin sold on the streets today. Most heroin sold will have at least a couple of different components used to make the drug. Poppy Plants All forms of heroin are made from opium poppy plants, and more specifically morphine, which is a substance derived from the seed pods of these plants.… 

Adderall and Sex Drive

What Is Adderall?  Adderall is a brand name for the combination of dextroamphetamine and amphetamine. It is prescribed for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder treatment and narcolepsy (sleep disorder) [1]. It is a stimulant that can cause euphoria when taken inappropriately. It can be addictive, and Adderall’s side effects can be life-threatening in some cases. One should never assume a drug is somehow “safe” to use in any quantity or conditions simply because it’s prescribed. Recreational use of Adderall can quickly progress to addiction and quitting the drug can be hellish and often leads to Adderall withdrawal symptoms. Recovery professionals recommend beginning the first phase of treatment in a supervised facility. This will all start by undergoing medically assisted Adderall addiction treatment in an inpatient drug rehab. In addition, taking psychoactive drugs like Adderall and mixing them with alcohol poses a great risk. Not only is mixing Adderall and alcohol bad, but it’s also deadly. Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a possible side effect for people taking Adderall. Some people report a lowered interest in sex and problem getting and keeping an erection. While some men report that Adderall negatively affects their sex drive, others experience the opposite. They find it increases their sex drive, and do not… 

LSD Withdrawal Symptoms

LSD Withdrawal Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is an extremely powerful psychedelic drug synthesized from ergot, a fungus that commonly grows on rye and other grains. Its hallucinogenic properties are so powerful that people measure their dosage in micrograms. As little as 25ug to 75ug, which users describe as a “mild experience,” can cause visual hallucinations, while a 700-1000ug can induce a “full out-of-body-experience[1].” LSD, however, in some cases, has the potential to cause psychological issues – especially in people with psychosis, schizophrenia, or a family history of mental illness. LSD may actually exacerbate these conditions. The US DEA classifies LSD as an illegal Schedule 1 controlled substance, which is very likely to be abused and doesn’t have any documented use in medical treatments. LSD works by stimulating the serotonin (brain chemical) production in the cortex and deep structures of the brain, by activating serotonin receptors. These serotonin receptors help interpret and visualize the real world. The additional serotonin allows more stimuli to be processed than usual.The brain filters out irrelevant stimuli, but with LSD this is not the case [2]. This overstimulation causes changes in thought, perceptions, attention, and emotions. These alterations appear as hallucinations. Sensations seem real, but they are…