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vyvanse and molly

Mixing Vyvanse and Molly, Dangers, Effects, Overdose & Addiction Treatment

Vyvanse Uses – Vyvanse and Molly

Vyvanse is a prescription drug, primarily used to treat symptoms of ADHD. The generic name of Vyvanse is lisdexamfetamine. It is a central nervous system stimulant. Vyvanse is classified as a Schedule II controlled substance in the U.S. because it can cause physical and psychological dependence, according to the United States federal government. Using this drug for more prolonged periods can change your brain chemistry, and make Vyvanse detox more challenging.

Some people may begin to see an improvement in their ADHD symptoms after a few days of taking Vyvanse. But it can take up to several weeks to experience the full effects of the medication.

Vyvanse Street Use

Vyvanse is a powerful medication, and while it is therapeutic for many, it also possesses a real potential for abuse, dependence, and addiction. A person places themselves at high risk for addiction development when they abuse Vyvanse.

vyvanse and molly
Though there is little information on the specific combination of Vyvanse and Molly, people often use other drugs with stimulants to enhance their high, and any polysubstance abuse increases the risk of experiencing adverse side effects.

People who become addicted to Vyvanse demonstrate a loss of control over how much or how often they take it. They also typically crave the drug and continue to use it despite negative consequences of using, which may include:

  • Employment problems
  • Legal difficulties
  • Family conflict

As with any drug, using higher and higher doses of Vyvanse increases the risk of an overdose. The reasons for this have to do with tolerance that develops after regular use, which leads a person to take larger doses to feel the high they felt when first using. Those high doses alone can create an increased risk for overdose.

Then, if repeated use continues, a person may develop significant physiological dependence, which is characterized (among other signs) by withdrawal symptoms when they stop using. When unpleasant withdrawal symptoms surface—depression and extreme fatigue, for instance—the person takes the drug again to “feel normal” and places themselves at a greater risk for adverse effects, particularly if they take an extra-large dose in hope of eliminating their symptoms that are making them feel so miserable.

The danger of overdose is also greater after a time of abstinence because their body’s tolerance for Vyvanse began to return to its pre-use levels. So when the person resumes using the drug at the same amount they did when their tolerance was high, the body can no longer handle it like it used to, and overdose often results.

Many people also engage in polysubstance abuse, abusing other drugs along with Vyvanse. Any time a person does this, their risk of overdose rises substantially due to the combined effects of the drugs taken together. Though there is little information on the specific combination of Vyvanse and Molly, people often use other drugs with stimulants to enhance their high, and any polysubstance abuse increases the risk of experiencing adverse side effects.

Emergency-room visits for stimulant overdoses, such as overdoses caused by Adderall, Vyvanse, Strattera, and Concerta, also involved another drug in about 63% of the cases. In 45% of these multi-drug–use cases, the drugs were also other prescription drugs. The most common prescription drugs taken along with stimulants include anti-anxiety medications and narcotic painkillers. Overall, 19% of people reported using alcohol along with stimulants. In 21% of the visits, street drugs were involved, with marijuana noted as the most common street drug used.

Vyvanse Drug Interactions

Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor’s approval.

Taking MAO inhibitors with this medication may cause a serious (possibly fatal) drug interaction. Avoid taking MAO inhibitors (isocarboxazid, linezolid, metaxalone, methylene blue, moclobemide, phenelzine, procarbazine, rasagiline, safinamide, selegiline, tranylcypromine) during treatment with this medication. Most MAO inhibitors should also not be taken for two weeks before treatment with this medication. Ask your doctor when to start or stop taking this medication.

Some products have ingredients that could raise your heart rate or blood pressure. Tell your pharmacist what products you are using, and ask how to use them safely (especially cough-and-cold products or diet aids).

The risk of serotonin syndrome/toxicity increases if you are also taking other drugs that increase serotonin. Examples include street drugs such as MDMA/ “ecstasy,” St. John’s wort, and certain antidepressants (including SSRIs such as fluoxetine/paroxetine, SNRIs such as duloxetine/venlafaxine), among others. The risk of serotonin syndrome/toxicity may be more likely when you start or increase the dose of these drugs.

Vyvanse is very similar to amphetamine or dextroamphetamine. Do not use medications containing amphetamine or dextroamphetamine while using Vyvanse.

This medication may interfere with certain laboratory tests (including blood and urine steroid levels), possibly causing false test results. Make sure laboratory personnel and all your doctors know you use this drug.

What is Molly, Mdma, or Extasis?

Methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA) is a synthetic drug that alters mood and perception (awareness of surrounding objects and conditions).  It is chemically similar to stimulants and hallucinogens, producing feelings of increased energy, pleasure, emotional warmth, and distorted sensory and time perception.  It was initially popular in the nightclub scene and at all-night dance parties (“raves”).

Because the drug now affects a broader range of people, commonly called Ecstasy or Molly.  Its chemical structure is similar to amphetamines, such as methamphetamine and a hallucinogen called mescaline.  Mescaline is the active ingredient in the drug peyote.

The unique chemical structure of MDMA causes both hallucinogenic and stimulant effects, such as bursts of energy, changes in how time is perceived, and sensitivity to touch.  Ecstasy and Molly come in pills, capsules, and powder. They’re well-known club drugs that are popular at music festivals.

vyvanse and molly
If you’re searching out the interactions between Vyvanse and molly do remember that with MDMA there’s no way to tell what it’s cut and mixed with. 

In 2016, an estimated 2.4 million people reported using ecstasy, according to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health published in September 2017, and an estimated 1.3 million people reported struggling with molly addiction.

How to Use Molly?

Molly can be taken in different ways and how quickly the drug reaches the brain depends on how it was taken. The faster a drug reaches the brain, the faster the rewarding effects are induced, and the more likely the user is to develop an addiction.

When swallowed, the effects of ecstasy can be felt around 30-45 minutes after dosing. Snorting the drug will cause these effects to arise more quickly and to be felt more intensely, increasing the risks associated with use. This is not to mention the potential damage done to the user’s nasal passages, sinuses, airways, and oropharynx (i.e., mouth and throat).

How Addictive is Molly

While the drug appears to have addictive properties, research hasn’t concluded how addictive ecstasy is.  However, it affects the same areas of the brain as other addictive drugs, according to NIDA.  In addition, animal studies show that MDMA causes drug-seeking behavior, but animals seek it less often than they desire other addictive drugs.  Some evidence indicates that MDMA affects parts of the brain in charge of self-control, pleasure, and reward. 

Unfortunately, researchers know little about how MDMA affects the brain.  As a result, their understanding of how other drugs lead to addiction is broader.  On the other hand, people who use Molly have reported classic symptoms of addiction, including cravings, tolerance, and withdrawal symptoms, and some continue to use the drug despite negative consequences.

Vyvanse Mixed With MDMA

Honestly, we don’t recommend mixing Vyvanse with MDMA. Vyvanse does nothing to enhance the effects of MDMA and can cause serious complications that are going to put a downer on your life. Like death for example, which is always a risk when mixing MDMA and Vyvanse.

When mixed with Vyvanse, MDMA can affect the body’s ability to keep the correct temperature. Indeed, this can also be caused by taking MDMA in higher quantities without mixing it with Vyvanse. Users sometimes experience a dangerous rise in body temperature (hyperthermia), which can result in liver, kidney, or heart failure—or even (as we said before) death.

Vyvanse and Molly Interactions

If you’re searching out the interactions between Vyvanse and molly do remember that with MDMA there’s no way to tell what it’s cut and mixed with.  Pure MDMA—meaning there are no other substances in it—is not a safe drug to take. MDMA on its own and even without Vyvanse can have many of the same effects as other stimulants like cocaine and amphetamines. A person using Ecstasy could experience increased heart rate and blood pressure, muscle tension, involuntary teeth clenching, nausea, blurred vision, faintness, and chills or sweating.

MDMA is just as likely to be mixed with other substances as any other drug. Supposedly “pure” Molly can contain ephedrine (a stimulant), dextromethorphan (a cough suppressant), ketamine, caffeine, cocaine, methamphetamine, or even bath salts. Just because it comes in crystal or powder form—instead of a pill like Ecstasy—doesn’t prove that it’s pure. With this being the case, there’s no way to accurately predict the effect of mixing Vyvanse and molly in your body. Indeed, the chemical reactions of MDMA and Vyvanse in your body could be different from someone else taking the same amount of Vyvanse and molly because of individual physiology.

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), a substantial percentage of Molly or Ecstasy contain some level of adulterants in them. So then it’s not just looking at the effects of mixing Vyvanse and Molly. It’s about mixing MDMA and Vyvanse and whatever else gets used as a cutting agent.

Common things used to cut MDMA

  • Paramethoxyamphetamine (PMA) or MDEA
  •  Aspirin
  •  Caffeine
  •  Methamphetamine or amphetamine
  •  Cocaine
  • Bath salts, including drugs like mephedrone
  •  Butylone
  •  Ketamine
  •  LSD

Worryingly, the DEA has also reported that “more than 80 different unique substances have been marketed as MDMA. Many drugs sold as Molly or ecstasy contain no MDMA at all.” Which is a worry, anyway you choose to look at it.

Vyvanse, MDMA and Fentanyl

What the above list of cutting agents doesn’t reveal is probably the most harrowing thing to emerge over the past few years. Being the widespread and unreserved use of Fentanyl as a cutting agent for MDMA and other drugs. Now, MDMA is used recreationally by many people. It’s illegal. And most people are informed enough to balance the risk (both of prosecution and to health) of taking MDMA and mixing MDMA with Vyvanse.

What most people don’t bargain on is getting a deadly dose of Fentanyl thinking it’s MDMA. Unacceptable behavior in the eyes of many, yet seemingly acceptable practice by those involved in the sale and production of MDMA. When we throw Fentanyl into the mix with MDMA and then Vyvanse the chances of a heart attack increase a lot.

Overdose effects of Vyvanse and MDMA

According to the most recent data, about 119,000 people are treated for problems related to ecstasy and MDMA in emergency rooms in the United States alone. Furthermore, one study found that in 2019, there were 19,458 deaths from psychostimulants including MDMA.

vyvanse and molly
It’s not just looking at the effects of mixing Vyvanse and Molly. It’s about mixing MDMA and Vyvanse and whatever else gets used as a cutting agent.

While it is possible to die as a result of ecstasy use, deaths from this drug are not necessarily a direct result of taking too much, but rather due to the side effects. And when mixing Vyvanse and MDMA these side effects may be enhanced rapidly and exponentially.

According to medical experts, direct deaths from MDMA and Ecstasy use are usually down to overheating. The MDMA interferes with the body’s ability to regulate temperature and Vyvanse interferes with this process even further. When people are then in warm environments or dancing, the risk of overheating is higher. The medical term for this is hyperthermia, and with hyperthermia, people are at an increased risk of:

  • Dehydration
  • Swelling of the brain
  • Muscle breakdown
  • Electrolyte imbalances
  • Organ failure

Vyvanse and Molly Emergencies

When MDMA users arrive at a hospital or rehab center physicians and staff will not immediately know what percent of the pills they’ve ingested were MDMA as opposed to other additives, or indeed what other substances (legal or illegal) have been ingested i.e. Vyvanse and molly. This requires blood toxicology examinations and while the results are being waited on, medical professionals will do their best to treat dehydration and overheating.

Once a patient is stabilized, there is a good chance of a full recovery. That being said, some cases of ecstasy overdose can be fatal, especially when Fentanyl and other highly dangerous cutting agents have been used.

If you have been using MDMA and ecstasy and find that it is difficult to stop, it is likely time to reach out for assistance. Don’t risk an overdose emergency or developing a chronic addiction.

Molly Addiction Treatment

Ecstasy is one of the less addictive stimulants and one of the more addictive hallucinogens. The number of people who listed ecstasy as their primary reason for going to rehab in 2015 was comparable to the number for all other hallucinogens combined, according to the 2005-2015 Treatment Episode Data Set by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration—in contrast, more than 60 times as many people sought treatment for methamphetamine addiction than ecstasy addiction that year. No medications are available for the treatment of stimulant addiction. That is why NIDA recommends cognitive behavioral therapy and support groups for people struggling to quit Molly.

Vyvanse Addiction Treatment

Addiction can be incredibly hard to live through, not just for the person directly affected but also for friends and family members who might watch a loved one deal with it. There are different options to manage this condition and increase the chances of a return to normal life.

Addiction Treatment Centers

Addiction treatment centers are a popular measure to help people overcome the seeking and using of drugs. In some instances, treatment centers may be gender- (such as female only) or age-specific (teenage only), to provide these groups with the level of care they need.

Medication

Certain drugs are useful for managing the withdrawal symptoms of Vyvanse addiction. These include medications that can stabilize neurotransmitters such as dopamine, norepinephrine, or serotonin. These drugs can help to provide relief from withdrawal effects and may help to prevent a relapse.