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Snort Gabapentin

Snort Gabapentin As A Sign Of Drug Abuse, Effects, Causes Of Addiction & Best Treatment Options

What Is Gabapentin Used For?

Gabapentin capsules, tablets, and oral solutions are used along with other medications to help control certain types of seizures in people who have epilepsy. The following are the main usage of the drug:

  • Gabapentin capsules, tablets, and oral solutions are also used to relieve the pain of postherpetic neuralgia (PHN; the burning, stabbing pain or aches that may last for months or years after an attack of shingles)
  • Gabapentin extended-release tablets (Horizant) are used to treat restless legs syndrome (RLS; a condition that causes discomfort in the legs and a strong urge to move the legs, especially at night and when sitting or lying down)
  • Gabapentin is an anti-epileptic agent that has shown preliminary evidence of efficacy for improving symptoms of cocaine addiction and alcohol withdrawal in pilot studies. Since the neurobiology of alcohol, cocaine, and nicotine withdrawal is similar, the efficacy of gabapentin for symptoms of alcohol and cocaine withdrawal suggests, that gabapentin might likely help nicotine withdrawal symptoms and thus tobacco abstinence [1]

Gabapentin is in a class of medications called anticonvulsants. [2] Gabapentin treats seizures by decreasing abnormal excitement in the brain. Gabapentin relieves the pain of PHN by changing the way the body senses pain. It is not known exactly how gabapentin works to treat restless legs syndrome. Can gabapentin be smoked? Yes, but beware of this type of consumption as it is a significant sign of developing an addiction to the drug. Another significant sign of abuse is when people snort gabapentin.

Snort Gabapentin
Do you snort gabapentin? If yes, you may develop an addiction to the drug and be in need of immediate help to avoid a potentially fatal overdose.

Why Do People Snort Gabapentin?

If you take a medicine such as gabapentin in a way that is different from what the doctor prescribed, it is called prescription drug misuse. It could be:

  • Taking a medicine that was prescribed for someone else
  • Taking a larger dose than you are supposed to
  • Taking the medicine in a different way than you are supposed to. This might be crushing tablets and then snorting or injecting them
  • Using the medicine for another purpose, such as getting high

Misusing some prescription drugs such as when you snort gabapentin, can lead to addiction. These include opioid addiction, sedatives, tranquilizers, and stimulants. [3]

Every medicine has some risk of side effects. Doctors take this into account when prescribing drugs. People who misuse these drugs may not understand the risks, especially those who smoke prescription drugs or when the people snort them; such as when some users snort gabapentin.

Can You Snort Gabapentin?

Gabapentin can have serious adverse effects, especially if a person takes too much, snorts it, or mixes it with other drugs. Unfortunately, recent reports have shown a rise in gabapentin abuse.

Some of the most severe dangers of snorting gabapentin include:

  • Difficulty breathing
  • Perforation of the nasal septum
  • Withdrawal seizures
  • Respiratory depression
  • Risk of overdose

Snorting drugs also generally leads to an increased risk of addiction due to a faster onset of effects and a more intense high. In addition to the dangers listed, gabapentin can lead to additional moderate to severe side effects, even when taken as prescribed or after it’s only taken once.

Side effects associated with gabapentin use may include:

  • Suicidal behavior and ideation
  • Respiratory depression
  • Withdrawal symptoms, including seizures
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Swelling of the lips, throat, and tongue
  • Central nervous system depression (sedation)
  • Dizziness
  • Tumorigenic potential (may form tumors)
  • Sudden death in patients with epilepsy

Abusing gabapentin in any way, including snorting it, can increase the risk of these adverse reactions. This is also true if a person is mixing gabapentin with other drugs like alcohol or opioids.

Snorting Gabapentin Effects

One case study described individuals snorting gabapentin powder from capsules and experiencing a high similar to that felt after snorting cocaine. Another commonly reported sensation from gabapentin misuse was sedation/relaxation/calmness.

How Much Gabapentin Do You Snort To Get High?

As with euphoria achieved from gabapentin misuse, sedation/relaxation/calmness was experienced in combination with other substances (e.g., quetiapine, alcohol, cannabis, buprenorphine/naloxone) or by taking gabapentin alone, and over a range of dosages (e.g., 600–4800 mg). Other effects experienced included: improved sociability, marijuana-like “high”, cocaine-like “high”, “amphetamine rush”, disassociation, MDMA-like “high”, increased energy and focus, improved quality of sleep, and becoming more talkative. [4]

Signs Of Gabapentin Abuse & Addiction

In 2004, gabapentin was prescribed over 18 million times. As of 2019, the number of prescriptions for this drug has increased to over 45 million. Gabapentin is primarily used to treat epilepsy, neuropathic pain, hot flashes, and restless legs syndrome. [5]

A gabapentin overdose is possible. What makes this possibility so shocking, however, is that since its creation in the 1980s, gabapentin was widely believed to be relatively harmless with no danger of misuse. Now, this anti-seizure medication has begun to draw national attention as alarming new trends show rising instances of abuse and directly-related fatalities.

The majority of gabapentin fatalities are caused by it being used in conjunction with another drug. However, that’s not to say this drug doesn’t have the potential to be dangerous on its own. In cases where gabapentin was the direct cause of death, blood concentrations of this medication ranged from 1.1 to 134 mg/L. The FDA has reported gabapentin overdoses of individuals who ingested 49 grams of the medication. Unfortunately, there have only been a handful of studies surrounding gabapentin toxicity so the exact amount of gabapentin it takes to overdose or causes a fatality has yet to be determined. [6]

Snort Gabapentin
People snort gabapentin to increase its side effects and experience a more intense high or sense of intoxication. 

There is no known medication to reverse the effects of a gabapentin overdose. Can you snort gabapentin? Yes, however, while some of the side effects can be mild, oxygen deprivation and seizures can be deadly and cause irreversible damage. The best way to prevent an overdose, however, is to curb abuse – of either this medication or another drug – in the first place.

In case of emergency/overdose:

If the victim has collapsed, had a seizure, has trouble breathing, or can’t be awakened, immediately call emergency services at 911.

Symptoms of overdose may include the following:

  • Double vision
  • Slurred speech
  • Drowsiness
  • Diarrhea

Is Gabapentin Addictive?

Can you snort gabapentin? Yes, when you’re addicted to it. Unfortunately, there have been numerous documented cases of gabapentin abuse, dependence, and withdrawal. Even though gabapentin is sometimes considered a treatment option for alcohol and substance abuse, it is important to monitor for drug-seeking behaviors. A history of alcohol or substance abuse appears to be an important part of a patient’s medical history when evaluating their risk for addiction and dependence behaviors. Health care providers need to be aware of this risk in their patients and monitor their patients for signs of abuse and dependence along with withdrawal symptoms. [7]

Can You Get Addicted To Gabapentin?

Gabapentin, a gamma-aminobutyric acid analog drug, appears to be safe and efficacious for the treatment of alcohol dependence. Gabapentin is not a controlled drug, but there are anecdotal reports of its misuse and abuse as well as reports of withdrawal symptoms associated with abrupt discontinuation. The risk of gabapentin misuse is inconsistent, the magnitude of the risk is small, and the risk is not comparable to the much higher risks associated with alcohol use; benzodiazepine addictionopioid addiction, stimulant drug use; or illicit drug use. Reports of gabapentin misuse are not unique to this drug, as misuse of prescription medications not typically considered “drugs of abuse” can also occur. [8]

Can you snort gabapentin? who does this? Prevalence of gabapentin misuse in the general population was reported to be 1%, 40-65% among individuals with prescriptions, and between 15 and 22% within populations of people who abuse opioids. An array of subjective experiences reminiscent of opioids, benzodiazepines, and psychedelics were reported over a range of doses, including those within clinical recommendations. Gabapentin was misused primarily for recreational purposes, self-medication, or intentional self-harm and was misused alone or in combination with other substances, especially opioids, benzodiazepines, and/or alcohol. Individuals with histories of drug abuse were most often involved in its misuse.

Epidemiological and case report evidence suggests that the anti-epileptic and analgesic medication gabapentin is being misused internationally, with substance abuse populations at special risk for misuse/abuse.

How can you determine someone already developed substance abuse to a certain drug? Can gabapentin be smoked to abuse the drug?

Substance use disorders are defined as a pattern of use that results in marked distress and/or impairment, with two or more of the following symptoms over the course of a 12-month period:

  1. Using the substance in larger amounts or over a longer period of time than intended
  2. Unsuccessful attempts or persistent desire to reduce the use
  3. Too much time spent on obtaining, using, and/or recovering from the effects of the substance
  4. A strong craving for the substance
  5. Significant interference with roles at work, school, or home
  6. Continued use despite recurrent social or interpersonal consequences
  7. Reducing or giving up important social, occupational, or recreational activities because of the substance use
  8. Substance use in situations in which it may be physically hazardous
  9. Substance use despite recurrent or persistent physical or psychological consequences
  10. Tolerance of the substance
  11. Withdrawal from the substance [9]

Treatment For Gabapentin Abuse & Addiction

Someone with an addiction to gabapentin and mental health disorders must treat both conditions. For the treatment to be effective, you need to stop using alcohol or drugs. Treatments may include behavioral therapies and medications. Also, support groups can give you emotional and social support. They are also a place where people can share tips about how to deal with day-to-day challenges.

Although these problems often occur together, this does not mean that one caused the other, even if one appeared first. In fact, it can be hard to figure out which came first. Researchers think that there are three possibilities as to why they occur together:

  • Common risk factors may contribute to both mental disorders and substance use disorders. These factors include genetics, stress, and trauma.
  • Mental disorders can contribute to drug use and substance use disorders. For example, people with mental disorders may use drugs or alcohol to try to feel better temporarily. This is known as self-medication. Also, mental disorders may change the brain to make it more likely you will become addicted.
  • Substance use and addiction can contribute to the development of a mental disorder. Substance use may change the brain in ways that make you more likely to develop a mental disorder.

A good dual diagnosis treatment program and drug addiction therapy facility need to be able to treat both conditions without treating one as the sole cause of the other. Addiction is a complicated disease and no one thing is to blame for it. There are various options available to handle drug addiction therapy.

Receive treatment for co-occurring disorders today.

As the addiction treatment community begins to realize that addiction is itself a mental disorder, the relationship between mental health and addiction disorders becomes more complicated. The greater treatment community largely lacks a proper understanding of dually diagnosed conditions, so these conditions are still treated separately, or worse–not treated or diagnosed at all. Dual diagnosis treatment centers in We Level Up Florida, California, Texas, and New Jersey are some of the facilities that have professionals trained to help treat co-occurring disorders concurrently. This type of tandem treatment provides some of the best success rates.

Get dual diagnosis treatment for individuals suffering from gabapentin drug addiction and mental health issues. Call us today! Can you snort gabapentin? Contact our addiction specialist to discuss further details and treatment options for you.

Can Gabapentin Be Smoked?
Can you snort gabapentin? Yes, when you’re abusing it. If you or a loved one is addicted to gabapentin contact We Level Up for a professional addiction rehab program.
Sources:

[1] Gabapentin for Smoking Cessation – https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00578552
[2] Gabapentin – U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health
[3] Prescription Drug MisuseU.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health
[4] Gabapentin misuse, abuse, and diversion: A systematic review – National Center for Biotechnology Information
[5] The number of gabapentin prescriptions in the U.S. from 2004 to 2019 – https://www.statista.com/statistics/781648/gabapentin-prescriptions-number-in-the-us/#:~:text=Number%20of%20gabapentin%20prescriptions%20in%20the%20U.S.%202004%2D2019&text=This%20statistic%20shows%20the%20total,increased%20to%20over%2045%20million

[6] Is A Gabapentin Overdose Possible? by Level Up Lake Worth
[7] Gabapentin: Abuse, Dependence, and Withdrawal – National Center for Biotechnology Information
[8] Gabapentin: can it be misused? – National Center for Biotechnology Information
[9] Adapted from American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5®). Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Publishing; 2013.